Continuous multisite accelerometry system allows the identification and differentiation of movements which are not apparent using conventional actigraphy

Mason, D. G., Terrill P. I., Suresh, S., Dakin, C. and Wilson, S. J. (2010). Continuous multisite accelerometry system allows the identification and differentiation of movements which are not apparent using conventional actigraphy. In: Special Issue: Sleep Down Under 2010 - Biodiversity of Sleep. Australian Sleep Association and Australian Sleep Technologists Association 22nd Annual Scientific Meeting. Annual Australian Sleep Association Conference, Christchurch, New Zealand, (66-67). 21-23 October 2010. doi:10.1111/j.1479-8425.2010.00457_4.x


Author Mason, D. G.
Terrill P. I.
Suresh, S.
Dakin, C.
Wilson, S. J.
Title of paper Continuous multisite accelerometry system allows the identification and differentiation of movements which are not apparent using conventional actigraphy
Conference name Annual Australian Sleep Association Conference
Conference location Christchurch, New Zealand
Conference dates 21-23 October 2010
Proceedings title Special Issue: Sleep Down Under 2010 - Biodiversity of Sleep. Australian Sleep Association and Australian Sleep Technologists Association 22nd Annual Scientific Meeting   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Sleep and Biological Rhythms   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Richmond VIC, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Publication Year 2010
Sub-type Published abstract
DOI 10.1111/j.1479-8425.2010.00457_4.x
ISSN 1446-9235
1479-8425
Volume 8
Issue Supp. 1
Start page 66
End page 67
Total pages 2
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Introduction: Actigraphy has grown in popularity as an additional measure of sleep behaviour in recent years. The extent of its role in sleep medicine is unclear, perhaps due to the low temporal resolution of commercial measurement systems available. Such systems typically monitor only a single location and do not record data synchronised with PSG systems meaning that temporal correlation between events
observed in other channels and actigraphy is difficult to ascertain. Further, conventional actigraphy records only summarised activity counts, implying that morphologically different movements may result in the same or similar activity counts. The aim of this technical case study was to directly compare data recorded using a Continuous Multisite Accelerometry System (CMAS) to an Actiwatch (TM).

Method: A male test subject wore an Actiwatch MiniMotionlogger (TM) on the left wrist, and the CMAS with accelerometers located on left wrist and middle fi nger, left ankle and great toe, and the sternal notch for an overnight sleep period.

Results: A number of interesting features were identifi ed including (A) Movement recorded on ankle and toe, in absence of movement from other channels indicating a kick of that leg; (B) Movement recorded on finger in absence of wrist movement indicating a finger twitch; (C) Movement in all accelerometry channels with a change in posture; and (D) Series of movements recorded only in toe accelerometry channel.

Discussion:
CMAS was able to identify and characterise subject movements, which were not able to be differentiated using the Actiwatch (TM). The multisite nature of the system detects movements which are not observed on Actiwatch.
Q-Index Code CX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published under Poster Abstracts: Special Issue: Sleep Down Under 2010 - Biodiversity of Sleep. Australian Sleep Association and Australian Sleep Technologists Association 22nd Annual Scientific Meeting.

 
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Created: Fri, 11 Mar 2011, 12:24:17 EST by Dr David Mason on behalf of School of Information Technol and Elec Engineering