Heart vs mind: What function do emotional and cognitive loyalty serve?

Härtel, Charmine E. J., Russell-Bennett, Rebekah, Lloyd, Shannon L. and Russell, Kay (2008). Heart vs mind: What function do emotional and cognitive loyalty serve?. In: Neal Ashkanasy, Charmine Härtel and Wilf Zerbe, Emonet VI: Sixth International Conference on Emotions and Organizational Life. Conference Program and Paper Abstracts. Emonet VI: Sixth International Conference on Emotions and Organizational Life, Fontainebleau, France, (13-13). 17-19 July 2008.

Author Härtel, Charmine E. J.
Russell-Bennett, Rebekah
Lloyd, Shannon L.
Russell, Kay
Title of paper Heart vs mind: What function do emotional and cognitive loyalty serve?
Conference name Emonet VI: Sixth International Conference on Emotions and Organizational Life
Conference location Fontainebleau, France
Conference dates 17-19 July 2008
Convener Emonet
Proceedings title Emonet VI: Sixth International Conference on Emotions and Organizational Life. Conference Program and Paper Abstracts
Place of Publication St. Lucia, QLD, Australia
Publisher UQ Business School, Faculty of Business, Economics and Law, University of Queensland
Publication Year 2008
Sub-type Published abstract
ISBN 9781864999174
1864999179
Editor Neal Ashkanasy
Charmine Härtel
Wilf Zerbe
Start page 13
End page 13
Total pages 1
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
While there is substantial research on attitudinal and behavioral loyalty, the deconstruction of attitudinal loyalty into its two key components - emotional and cognitive loyalty – has been largely ignored. Despite the existence of managerial strategies aimed at increasing each of these two components, there is little academic research to support these managerial efforts. This paper seeks to advance the understanding of emotional and cognitive brand loyalty by examining the psychological function that these dimensions of brand loyalty perform for the consumer. We employ Katz’s (1960) four functions of attitudes (utilitarian, knowledge, value-expression, ego-defence) to investigate this question. Surveys using a convenience sample were completed by 268 consumers in two metropolitan cities on a variety of goods, services and durable products. The relationship between the functions and dimensions of loyalty were examined using MANOVA. The results show that both the utilitarian and knowledge functions of loyalty are significantly positively related to cognitive loyalty while the ego-defensive function of loyalty is significantly positively related to emotional loyalty. The results for the value-expressive function of loyalty were non-significant.
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes Presented during the Poster Session "Emotion In Five Cultures". Awarded "Highly Commended Paper".

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: UQ Business School Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 11 Mar 2011, 12:05:59 EST by Professor Charmine Hartel on behalf of UQ Business School