Can system of systems be given self-x requirement engineering capabilities?

MacDiarmid, Alisdair and Lindsay, Peter (2010). Can system of systems be given self-x requirement engineering capabilities?. In: Proceedings of the Systems Engineering and Test and Evaluation Conference 2010 (SETE 2010). Systems Engineering and Test and Evaluation Conference 2010 (SETE 2010), Adelaide, South Australia, (1-15). 3-6 May 2010.

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Author MacDiarmid, Alisdair
Lindsay, Peter
Title of paper Can system of systems be given self-x requirement engineering capabilities?
Conference name Systems Engineering and Test and Evaluation Conference 2010 (SETE 2010)
Conference location Adelaide, South Australia
Conference dates 3-6 May 2010
Proceedings title Proceedings of the Systems Engineering and Test and Evaluation Conference 2010 (SETE 2010)
Place of Publication Australia
Publisher Systems Engineering Society of Australia
Publication Year 2010
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 9780975202845
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Language eng
Abstract/Summary System of Systems (SoS) are a relatively recent phenomenon and present a whole new set of challenges for systems engineers. The system elements of an SoS are often managed and operated in a predominantly independent manner, over widely distributed geographic locations and are subject to evolution with various rates of change. The goals of the SoS itself often change over time. One purpose of this paper is to survey the literature on requirements management issues that are brought to the fore as a result of these and other SoS characteristics. We then explore a vision of how the key artefacts of requirements engineering might need to evolve, together with their supporting tools and processes, in order to better support the development, operation and maintenance of SoS’s. The vision is inspired by the autonomic computing paradigm, in which computing systems are equipped with self-x capabilities – such as self-configuration and self-healing – in order to manage themselves. Rather than presenting a solution our purpose is to better understand the new requirements engineering capabilities that will be required for SoS.
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Thu, 10 Mar 2011, 14:34:15 EST by Professor Peter Lindsay on behalf of School of Information Technol and Elec Engineering