The national registration and accreditation scheme: What would inclusion mean for naturopathy and Western herbal medicine? Part I: The legislation

Wardle, Jon (2010) The national registration and accreditation scheme: What would inclusion mean for naturopathy and Western herbal medicine? Part I: The legislation. Australian Journal of Medical Herbalism, 22 4: 113-118.

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Author Wardle, Jon
Title The national registration and accreditation scheme: What would inclusion mean for naturopathy and Western herbal medicine? Part I: The legislation
Journal name Australian Journal of Medical Herbalism   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1033-8330
Publication date 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 22
Issue 4
Start page 113
End page 118
Total pages 6
Editor Anne Cowper
Place of publication Concord West, NSW, Australia
Publisher National Herbalists Association of Australia
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
On 26 March 2008 the Commonwealth, State and Territory Health Ministers agreed to partake in a national registration scheme for health professionals to replace the State based regulation of health practitioners. This was part of a wider range of measures designed to reduce regulatory burdens, not just in health but in all areas of business in general. This led to the ultimate design and introduction of the National Health Practitioner Regulation National Law Act 2009 (Qld) (the National Law).

The legislation was designed and introduced in Queensland (which, being the only unicameral state in Australia, means that changes approved by the Ministerial Council – comprised of the Health Ministers from each State and territory and the Commonwealth – need only be ratified by the lower house to apply as law) with other states employing various ‘me too’ clauses in their respective laws. This means (in theory) that once the law has been amended in Queensland it automatically applies nationally. Additionally the legislation has enabled the creation of shared infrastructure between each of the professional boards, substantially reducing the variability and costs associated with health practitioner regulation. Full details are available at the website of the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (www.ahpra.gov.au).

Although currently including only regulated or partially regulated professions (Chinese medicine has been earmarked for inclusion in 2012 under the latter category), completely unregulated (in a statutory sense) professions may be considered for inclusion in this Scheme. It is likely that naturopaths and Western herbalists will be amongst the first of these professions considered for inclusion in the Scheme.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
ERA 2012 Admin Only
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 09 Mar 2011, 14:49:07 EST by Geraldine Fitzgerald on behalf of School of Public Health