Gallstones at autopsy and cholecystectomy: A comparative study

Vitetta, L., Sali, A., Chou, S.T., Fleming, H., Little, P. and Elzarka, A. (1988) Gallstones at autopsy and cholecystectomy: A comparative study. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Surgery, 58 7: 561-568.


Author Vitetta, L.
Sali, A.
Chou, S.T.
Fleming, H.
Little, P.
Elzarka, A.
Title Gallstones at autopsy and cholecystectomy: A comparative study
Journal name Australian and New Zealand Journal of Surgery   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0004-8682
Publication date 1988-07
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 58
Issue 7
Start page 561
End page 568
Total pages 8
Place of publication Richmond, VIC, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Language eng
Formatted abstract
An examination of 613 post-mortems gave a prevalence of biliary disease at autopsy of 36.5%, higher than reported previously in Austrialia. This consisted of an asymptomatic gallstone prevalence of 18.9%, with a further 5.7% of the autopsies having granular biliary sludge and 11.9% having had a previous cholecystectomy. Although the rate of occurrence of cholesterol gallstones was approximately half that of the pigment gallstones and pigment biliary sludge combined, no significant association between the sex of the post-mortems and stone type was observed at autopsy (χ 1 2 = 0.1; P > 0.05). The ratio of biliary disease between females and males was approximately 2:1. Gallstones and biliary sludge from 310 cholecystectomy patients showed that cholesterol gallstones were approximately twice as common in men, and approximately six times as common in women than pigment gallstones. In this group of patients there was a significant association between the sex of the patient and the rate of occurrence of stone type. The rat of occurrence of cholesterol gallstones was significantly higher than pigment gallstones in both the males and females at cholecystectomy (χ 1 2 = 18.97; P < 0.0001). A female to male ratio of approximately 2:1 was also observed. A statistically significant higher rate of pigmented biliary disease was observed at autopsy than at cholecystectomy. (χ 1 2 = 101.0; P < 0.0001). Analyses on biliary sludge, a filterable, fine granular pigmented material in bile, suggest that it may be the direct precursor for a number of different gallstone types.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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