Improving the reach of vaccines to low-resource regions, with a needle-free vaccine delivery device and long-term thermostabilization

Chen, Xianfeng, Fernando, Germain J. P., Crichton, Michael L., Flaim, Christopher, Yukiko, Sally R., Fairmaid, Emily J., Corbett, Holly J., Primiero, Clare A., Ansaldo, Alexander B., Frazer, Ian H., Brown, Lorena E. and Kendall, Mark A. F. (2011) Improving the reach of vaccines to low-resource regions, with a needle-free vaccine delivery device and long-term thermostabilization. Journal of Controlled Release, 152 3: 349-355. doi:10.1016/j.jconrel.2011.02.026

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Author Chen, Xianfeng
Fernando, Germain J. P.
Crichton, Michael L.
Flaim, Christopher
Yukiko, Sally R.
Fairmaid, Emily J.
Corbett, Holly J.
Primiero, Clare A.
Ansaldo, Alexander B.
Frazer, Ian H.
Brown, Lorena E.
Kendall, Mark A. F.
Title Improving the reach of vaccines to low-resource regions, with a needle-free vaccine delivery device and long-term thermostabilization
Journal name Journal of Controlled Release   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0168-3659
1873-4995
Publication date 2011-06-30
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jconrel.2011.02.026
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 152
Issue 3
Start page 349
End page 355
Total pages 7
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Subject 300504 Immunology
Formatted abstract
Dry-coated microprojections can deliver vaccine to abundant antigen-presenting cells in the skin and induce efficient immune responses and the dry-coated vaccines are expected to be thermostable at elevated temperatures. In this paper, we show that we have dramatically improved our previously reported gas-jet drying coating method and greatly increased the delivery efficiency of coating from patch to skin to from 6.5% to 32.5%, by both varying the coating parameters and removing the patch edge. Combined with our previous dose sparing report of influenza vaccine delivery in a mouse model, the results show that we now achieve equivalent protective immune responses as intramuscular injection (with the needle and syringe), but with only 1/30th of the actual dose. We also show that influenza vaccine coated microprojection patches are stable for at least 6 months at 23 °C, inducing comparable immunogenicity with freshly coated patches. The dry-coated microprojection patches thus have key and unique attributes in ultimately meeting the medical need in certain low-resource regions with low vaccine affordability and difficulty in maintaining “cold-chain” for vaccine storage and transport.
Keyword Microprojection
Vaccine coating
Thermostability
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Wed, 09 Mar 2011, 11:54:48 EST by Germain Fernando on behalf of Aust Institute for Bioengineering & Nanotechnology