A lecture by the returning chair of Australian studies, Harvard University 2008-09: Australian archaeology as a historical science

Davidson, Iain (2010) A lecture by the returning chair of Australian studies, Harvard University 2008-09: Australian archaeology as a historical science. Journal of Australian Studies, 34 3: 377-398. doi:10.1080/14443058.2010.498494


Author Davidson, Iain
Title A lecture by the returning chair of Australian studies, Harvard University 2008-09: Australian archaeology as a historical science
Journal name Journal of Australian Studies   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1444-3058
1835-6419
Publication date 2010-09
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/14443058.2010.498494
Volume 34
Issue 3
Start page 377
End page 398
Total pages 22
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic, Australia
Publisher Routledge
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Abstract 'Archaeologists make up stories about the past, but not just any stories.' Archaeological stories are written principally from the interpretation of material remains. Increasingly we also use evidence from a variety of other sources, such as genetics and linguistics. In Australia, as in other countries colonised from Europe, the stories are about the past of Indigenous peoples and so are generally believed to have an important relationship with the ethnographic description of traditional behaviour. But the relationship is not straightforward. Ethnographic accounts show that there are oral and other histories that account for the way those people are. For this reason, archaeological histories are not always easily adopted by Aboriginal Australians, particularly as they are, in almost all cases, written by non-Aboriginal people. I suggest that an alternative approach is to look at the record of ethnographies and historical material culture around Australia as indicating what is to be explained through the analysis of archaeological materials, just as geneticists and linguists begin from the analysis of the variation in modern samples. An archaeological approach to the diversity of peoples in Australia requires an understanding of the symbolic construction of identity in the past. But symbols, because of their very nature, are difficult to interpret, so special care is needed to work out how the diversity was constructed, and attention needs to be paid to different scales of analysis. Archaeology has proceeded rather as other sciences proceed, by putting up hypotheses, testing them, and moving on to the next hypothesis once the test is satisfactorily conducted. The conclusions must be understood as historical though the methods of arriving at them are like the process of science. In this regard, just as an unchanging Dreaming is said to be successively revealed as new claims are established, so archaeological history, too, is successively revealed. © 2011 Informa plc
Keyword Australian archaeology
Historical narrative
Hypothesis testing
Science
Demography
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Social Science Publications
 
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