Do sheep regulate the size of their mallophagan louse populations?

James, P. J. (1999) Do sheep regulate the size of their mallophagan louse populations?. International Journal for Parasitology, 29 6: 869-875.


Author James, P. J.
Title Do sheep regulate the size of their mallophagan louse populations?
Journal name International Journal for Parasitology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0020-7519
1879-0135
Publication date 1999-06-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/S0020-7519(99)00055-7
Volume 29
Issue 6
Start page 869
End page 875
Total pages 6
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Formatted abstract Alternatives to chemicals for controlling parasites are required to minimise problems from resistance, residues in animal products and occupational exposure. Utilisation of host response to parasites through selection of resistant types or vaccination is an appealing option. To date most studies have been with haematophagous or invasive parasites which directly contact elements of the host immune system. Sheep lice (Bovicola ovis) feed superficially on the skin of sheep ingesting lipid, scurf, bacteria and loose stratum corneum squames. Evidence is presented that despite their surface feeding habit Bovicola ovis stimulate an immune response in sheep and that this response may play a part in regulating the size of louse populations.
Keyword Bovicola ovis
Ectoparasite
Immune response
Phthiraptera
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation
 
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Created: Mon, 07 Mar 2011, 15:09:59 EST