The effect of Banana streak virus on the growth and yield of dessert bananas in tropical Australia

Daniells, J. W., Geering, A. D. W., Bryde, N. J. and Thomas, J. E. (2001) The effect of Banana streak virus on the growth and yield of dessert bananas in tropical Australia. Annals of Applied Biology, 139 1: 51-60. doi:10.1111/j.1744-7348.2001.tb00130.x


Author Daniells, J. W.
Geering, A. D. W.
Bryde, N. J.
Thomas, J. E.
Title The effect of Banana streak virus on the growth and yield of dessert bananas in tropical Australia
Journal name Annals of Applied Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0003-4746
1744-7348
Publication date 2001
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1744-7348.2001.tb00130.x
Volume 139
Issue 1
Start page 51
End page 60
Total pages 10
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Language eng
Abstract We have examined the effect of a strain of Banana streak virus (BSV-Cav) on the growth and yield of dessert bananas (Musa AAA group, Cavendish subgroup cv. Williams) in north Queensland, Australia. Healthy and infected plants were compared in a replicated field experiment over plant and first ratoon crops. In both crops, symptom expression followed a similar pattern, increasing to a maximum near the estimated time of bunch initiation, then decreasing in the period prior to bunch emergence. There was no evidence of plant-to-plant spread of virus, but the rate of transmission through suckers was 100%. In the plant crop, the mean bunch weights of healthy and infected plants were not significantly different. However, BSV-Cav infection resulted in an 18 day delay in harvest, causing a 6% reduction in yield per annum. In the ratoon crop, the mean bunch weight of infected plants was 7% less than that of healthy plants, and the interval between the harvest of plant and ratoon crops was delayed by 9 days, resulting in a 11% reduction in yield per annum. Also, the mean length of fruit from infected plants was 5% less than that of healthy plants, resulting in a smaller percentage of fruit in the extra large size category. We conclude that in horticulturally favourable conditions typical of the tropical Australian banana industry, the effects of BSV-Cav infection on the growth and yield of Cavendish bananas are small.
Keyword Musa
Cavendish banana
BSV
Badnavirus
Symptoms
ELISA
Economic impact
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation
 
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Created: Mon, 07 Mar 2011, 15:07:19 EST