PHENOPSIS, an automated platform for reproducible phenotyping of plant responses to soil water deficit in Arabidopsis thaliana permitted the identification of an accession with low sensitivity to soil water deficit

Granier, Christine, Aguirrezabal, Luis, Chenu, Karine, Cookson, Sarah Jane, Dauzat, Myriam, Hamard, Philippe, Thioux, Jean-Jacques, Rolland, Gaelle, Bouchier-Combaud, Sandrine, Lebaudy, Anne, Muller, Bertrand, Simonneau, Thierry and Tardieu, François (2006) PHENOPSIS, an automated platform for reproducible phenotyping of plant responses to soil water deficit in Arabidopsis thaliana permitted the identification of an accession with low sensitivity to soil water deficit. New Phytologist, 169 3: 623-635. doi:10.1111/j.1469-8137.2005.01609.x


Author Granier, Christine
Aguirrezabal, Luis
Chenu, Karine
Cookson, Sarah Jane
Dauzat, Myriam
Hamard, Philippe
Thioux, Jean-Jacques
Rolland, Gaelle
Bouchier-Combaud, Sandrine
Lebaudy, Anne
Muller, Bertrand
Simonneau, Thierry
Tardieu, François
Title PHENOPSIS, an automated platform for reproducible phenotyping of plant responses to soil water deficit in Arabidopsis thaliana permitted the identification of an accession with low sensitivity to soil water deficit
Formatted title
PHENOPSIS, an automated platform for reproducible phenotyping of plant responses to soil water deficit in Arabidopsis thaliana permitted the identification of an accession with low sensitivity to soil water deficit
Journal name New Phytologist   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0028-646X
1469-8137
Publication date 2006-01
Year available 2005
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1469-8137.2005.01609.x
Volume 169
Issue 3
Start page 623
End page 635
Total pages 13
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Formatted abstract
• The high-throughput phenotypic analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana collections requires methodological progress and automation. Methods to impose stable and reproducible soil water deficits are presented and were used to analyse plant responses to water stress.
• Several potential complications and methodological difficulties were identified, including the spatial and temporal variability of micrometeorological conditions within a growth chamber, the difference in soil water depletion rates between accessions and the differences in developmental stage of accessions the same time after sowing. Solutions were found.
• Nine accessions were grown in four experiments in a rigorously controlled growth-chamber equipped with an automated system to control soil water content and take pictures of individual plants. One accession, An1, was unaffected by water deficit in terms of leaf number, leaf area, root growth and transpiration rate per unit leaf area.
• Methods developed here will help identify quantitative trait loci and genes involved in plant tolerance to water deficit.
Keyword Arabidopsis thaliana
Automatic processing
Genetic variability
Leaf development
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown
Additional Notes Article first published online: 25 NOV 2005

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation
 
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