Mineral particulates and vegetation: Modelled effects of dust on photosynthesis in plant canopies

Doley, David and Rossato, Laurence (2010) Mineral particulates and vegetation: Modelled effects of dust on photosynthesis in plant canopies. Air Quality and Climate Change, 44 2: 22-27.

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Author Doley, David
Rossato, Laurence
Title Mineral particulates and vegetation: Modelled effects of dust on photosynthesis in plant canopies
Journal name Air Quality and Climate Change   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1444-2841
0009-8647
Publication date 2010-05
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 44
Issue 2
Start page 22
End page 27
Total pages 6
Place of publication Surrey Hills North, VIC, Australia
Publisher Clean Air Society of Australia & New Zealand
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Deposition of mining, quarry and road dust on vegetation canopies has been observed to inhibit plant growth when dust burdens exceed 7 g m{-2} but there is little quantitative information on the effects of dust deposition at typical rates for industrial or agricultural environments. Using published data for the functioning of cotton leaves and canopies, variations in several components of cotton canopy photosynthesis were analysed. Daily totals of plant dry matter increase are linearly related to net dust deposition rate up to 1 g m{-2} d{-1}. For cotton plants that mature during sunny weather, it is estimated that a net rate of coarse coal over burden dust deposition of 0.5 g m{-2} d{-1} may reduce canopy photosynthesis by about 11% and cotton fibre yield by about 3%. Modeling also indicates that the impact of dust deposition on vegetation at the bottom of a plant canopy is greater than on vegetation that is fully exposed to sunlight. These differences mean that acceptable dust burdens may vary between species and their positions in the plant community. By incorporating several generalised physiological characteristics of plants it is possible to estimate the likely effects of dust deposition on vegetation and thereby the environmental risks associated with proposed dust-generating activities.


Keyword Light interception
Vegetation crop growth
Mining
Quarry
Dust
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Centre for Mined Land Rehabilitation Publications
Official 2011 Collection
 
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Created: Mon, 07 Mar 2011, 12:05:29 EST by Laurelle Elliott on behalf of Centre For Mined Land Rehabilitation