A qualitative analysis of stress, uplifts and coping in the personal and professional lives of Singaporean nurses

Lim, Joanne, Hepworth, Julie and Bogossian, Fiona (2011) A qualitative analysis of stress, uplifts and coping in the personal and professional lives of Singaporean nurses. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 67 5: 1022-1033. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2648.2010.05572.x


Author Lim, Joanne
Hepworth, Julie
Bogossian, Fiona
Title A qualitative analysis of stress, uplifts and coping in the personal and professional lives of Singaporean nurses
Journal name Journal of Advanced Nursing   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0309-2402
1365-2648
Publication date 2011-05
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2648.2010.05572.x
Volume 67
Issue 5
Start page 1022
End page 1033
Total pages 12
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Aim.
This paper is a report of a descriptive study of nurses' experiences of daily stress and coping.

Background.
Much of the research on stress in nursing is quantitative and has focused on only work stressors. Moreover, few studies have examined the uplifting side of living and the role it may play in moderating stress. A theoretical framework on stress and coping, 'hassles' and 'uplifts' was used to examine nurses' experiences across their personal and professional lives from a qualitative perspective.

Methods.
A purposive sample of Singaporean hospital nurses (n=23) identified using a snowball sampling technique, participated in two sets of email interviews in 2009. The qualitative data were analysed using thematic analysis.

Results.

Three themes were identified as constituting daily hassles: (i) time pressures, (ii) nature of nursing work and (iii) multiple roles. Uplifts were expressed in relation to one main theme of feeling good extending across nurses' personal and professional lives. Three themes were identified as ways of coping: (i) taking time out, (ii) seeking emotional support and (iii) belief systems.

Conclusion.
The interaction between personal and professional life plays a major role in Singaporean nurses' experiences of stress and coping. However, stress may be ameliorated through effective management and strong familial support. Nurses and employers are recommended to use uplifts and identify ways of coping to minimize attrition and contribute to the development of a healthy workforce. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Keyword Coping
Interviews
Nurses
Nursing
Qualitative
Singapore
Stress
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article first published online: 24 JAN 2011

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 9 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 02 Mar 2011, 12:59:11 EST by Ms Joanne Lim on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work