Traversing the Pacific: Modernity on the move from coast to coast

Ahrens, Prue and Dixon, Chris (2010). Traversing the Pacific: Modernity on the move from coast to coast. In Prue Ahrens and Chris Dixon (Ed.), Coast to Coast: Case Histories of Modern Pacific Crossings (pp. 1-7) Newcastle upon Tyne, U.K.: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Ahrens, Prue
Dixon, Chris
Title of chapter Traversing the Pacific: Modernity on the move from coast to coast
Title of book Coast to Coast: Case Histories of Modern Pacific Crossings
Place of Publication Newcastle upon Tyne, U.K.
Publisher Cambridge Scholars Publishing
Publication Year 2010
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
Series Pacific Focus
ISBN 9781443823951
1443823953
Editor Prue Ahrens
Chris Dixon
Chapter number 1
Start page 1
End page 7
Total pages 7
Total chapters 10
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
From the beginnings of human settlement through to the Cook voyages and beyond, histories of ‘the Pacific’ are stories of contact and connection. This vast region can be charted through histories of encounter between the diverse peoples of the Pacific, the Pacific Rim and the wider world. Coast to Coast explores the networks of modernity that connected the various peoples of the Pacific, Australia and North America as new means of transportation, distribution and communication developed from the mid-nineteenth century. The dynamics of the market revolution transformed commercial practices during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and the Pacific became a conduit through which the ‘modern’ economies on the Pacific Rim traded, communicated and exchanged ideas. Modern means of representation and reproduction affected the cultural encounters, changing the ways people imagine themselves and other, and shaping social interactions. The very act of crossing the Pacific was in itself transformative, as preconceptions were challenged and assumptions overturned. For some, the Pacific was ‘home’; others were outsiders or more recent arrivals. But as the essays contained herein reveal, each shared a fascination, sometimes an obsession, with how ‘the Pacific’ could be understood.
Copyright © 2010 by Prue Ahrens, Chris Dixon and contributors
Q-Index Code B1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Tue, 01 Mar 2011, 14:22:29 EST by Ms Stormy Wehi on behalf of School of Communication and Arts