Nautilus pompilius fishing and population decline in the Philippines: A comparison with an unexploited Australian Nautilus population

Dunstan, A., Alanis, O. and Marshall, J. (2010) Nautilus pompilius fishing and population decline in the Philippines: A comparison with an unexploited Australian Nautilus population. Fisheries Research, 106 2: 239-247. doi:10.1016/j.fishres.2010.06.015


Author Dunstan, A.
Alanis, O.
Marshall, J.
Title Nautilus pompilius fishing and population decline in the Philippines: A comparison with an unexploited Australian Nautilus population
Formatted title
Nautilus pompilius fishing and population decline in the Philippines: A comparison with an unexploited Australian Nautilus population
Journal name Fisheries Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0165-7836
1872-6763
Publication date 2010-10
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.fishres.2010.06.015
Volume 106
Issue 2
Start page 239
End page 247
Total pages 9
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Baseline capture and mark-and-release studies of Nautilus pompilius conducted at Osprey Reef, Coral Sea, Australia reveal that this unexploited population is stable from a catch per unit effort (CPUE) basis over 12 years. In contrast, data from a detailed interview questionnaire of N. pompilius fishers and traders in Palawan, Philippines highlight a fishery that is unsustainable. The results from the Philippines show up to 80% declines in reported CPUE from 1980 to the present, fewer than three Nautilus generations, which can be attributed to fishing pressure. This is evidence for N. pompilius (and by ecological association, other Nautilus species) to be assessed as 'endangered' in the IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) Red List. Questionnaire responses suggested there is no cultural or historical relevance of Nautilus fishing to local communities and the fishery only provides approximately 10-20 years of economic return before becoming non-viable. Identification of new Nautilus fishing sites and training of locals by buyers from distant depleted fishing areas illustrate how the value and demand for Nautilus shells generates fishing pressure. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes [Special issue] 'Fished Cephalopods: new insights into recurrent issues Method development and evaluation of stock reproductive potential of marine fish - Research presented at the 2009 Cephalopod International Advisory Council Symposium, 2009 Cephalopod International Advisory Council Symposium'

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
Queensland Brain Institute Publications
School of Biomedical Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 28 Feb 2011, 16:03:45 EST by Debra McMurtrie on behalf of Queensland Brain Institute