Terms of engagement: Consensus or control in remote Australian resource management

Measham Thomas G., Richards Carol, Robinson Cathy, Larson, Silva and Brake, Lynn (2009). Terms of engagement: Consensus or control in remote Australian resource management. SEED Working Paper; CSIRO working paper series 2009-10 35, Socio-Economics and the Environment in Discussion (SEED). CSIRO, CSIRO.

Author Measham Thomas G.
Richards Carol
Robinson Cathy
Larson, Silva
Brake, Lynn
Title Terms of engagement: Consensus or control in remote Australian resource management
School, Department or Centre Socio-Economics and the Environment in Discussion (SEED). CSIRO
Institution CSIRO
Series SEED Working Paper; CSIRO working paper series 2009-10
Report Number 35
Publication date 2009
Publisher CSIRO
Total pages 30
Language eng
Subject 970116 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of Human Society
160403 Social and Cultural Geography
160401 Economic Geography
Abstract/Summary Community-based natural resource management (NRM) has seen a shift in the discourse from participation to engagement, reflecting a focus on increasingly active citizen involvement in management and action. This paper considers this shift in relation to two contrasting theoretical perspectives. The first is deliberative democracy, drawing on Habermas, which emphasises the importance of discussing and rationalising values and actions. The second is governmentality, or ‘governing through community’ which draws on Foucault, emphasising neo-liberal management styles and ‘self-help’. In considering the empirical relevance of these theoretical perspectives, this paper draws on a case study of public engagement in NRM in the Lake Eyre Basin, a remote, inland region of Australia. This research yielded a practical set of “factors for success” for public engagement in remote areas. The findings support the view that, especially in remote regions, public engagement in NRM reflects contrasting goals. We make two conclusions. First, that these contrasting objectives emphasise the tension between deliberative and neo-liberal conceptualisations of engagement; and second, the evidence for neo-liberal interpretations of engagement are stronger than for deliberative interpretations of engagement in the case study region.
Keyword Community-based natural resource management
Consensus
Remote Australian Resource Management
Public engagement
Participation
Decentralisation
Governmentality
Deliberation
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown
Additional Notes 1834-5638

Document type: Working Paper
Collection: School of Social Science Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 24 Feb 2011, 16:59:01 EST by Debbie Lim on behalf of School of Social Science