Disembodied design and selection: Problems for analogies between organisms and artifacts

Bamford, Gregory S. (2010). Disembodied design and selection: Problems for analogies between organisms and artifacts. In: Helle Hove, Per Galle and Nina Lynge, CEPHAD 2010: The borderland between philosophy and design research. Regular table sessions & master class sessions of the CEPHAD 2010 Conference. CEPHAD 2010 Conference: The borderland between philosophy and design research, Copenhagen, Denmark, (21-23). 26-29 January 2010.

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Author Bamford, Gregory S.
Title of paper Disembodied design and selection: Problems for analogies between organisms and artifacts
Conference name CEPHAD 2010 Conference: The borderland between philosophy and design research
Conference location Copenhagen, Denmark
Conference dates 26-29 January 2010
Proceedings title CEPHAD 2010: The borderland between philosophy and design research. Regular table sessions & master class sessions of the CEPHAD 2010 Conference
Journal name Copenhagen Working Papers on Design
Place of Publication Copenhagen, Denmark
Publisher The Danish Design School (Danmarks Designskole)
Publication Year 2010
Sub-type Published abstract
ISBN 9788798547860
8798547860
Editor Helle Hove
Per Galle
Nina Lynge
Volume 2010
Issue 1
Start page 21
End page 23
Total pages 3
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
In Organisms and Artifacts: Design in Nature and Elsewhere, Tim Lewens examines the role and value of the artifact metaphor for understanding the design of organisms, and to a lesser extent (as the title of his book suggests) the design of artifacts. Lewens sketches the “artifact model for organisms” and the “artifact model for artifacts”, aiming to show the similarities in design and selection. Indeed, Lewens says these models are “isomorphic”. In the recourse to metaphor or analogy, however, we can appear to find something similar to A in B because our view of A has already been shaped by our view of B. This is the thought I explore in this paper: the extent to which the artifact model for organisms may depend in some important ways on a prior understanding of artifacts in terms of organisms.
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Note that the ISBN as published in this proceedings is incorrectly assigned to the title. Presented during Table Session T1, and published under "Regular table sessions". This presentation was later published in full under the title "Representational and Realised Design: Problems for Analogies between Organisms and Artifacts".

 
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Created: Wed, 23 Feb 2011, 11:17:35 EST by Deirdre Timo on behalf of School of Architecture