Prior statin use is not associated with improved outcome in emergency patients admitted with infection: A prospective observational study

Williams, Julian, Greenslade, Jaimi, Chu, Kevin, Brown, Anthony F., Paterson, David and Lipman, Jeffrey (2011) Prior statin use is not associated with improved outcome in emergency patients admitted with infection: A prospective observational study. Academic Emergency Medicine, 18 2: 127-134. doi:10.1111/j.1553-2712.2010.00976.x


Author Williams, Julian
Greenslade, Jaimi
Chu, Kevin
Brown, Anthony F.
Paterson, David
Lipman, Jeffrey
Title Prior statin use is not associated with improved outcome in emergency patients admitted with infection: A prospective observational study
Journal name Academic Emergency Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1069-6563
1553-2712
Publication date 2011-02-11
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1553-2712.2010.00976.x
Volume 18
Issue 2
Start page 127
End page 134
Total pages 8
Place of publication Malden, MA, U.S.A.
Publisher Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objectives: 
The objective was to determine whether prior statin use is associated with lower mortality in emergency patients admitted with infection.

Methods: 
A prospective observational study was conducted at the emergency department (ED) of a tertiary adult hospital with an annual census of over 73,000 patients. Patients presenting to the ED who were subsequently hospitalized with a primary diagnosis of infection were identified within 24 hours of presentation. Data were abstracted from patients’ charts and from hospital electronic databases. Patients were stratified according to reported regular statin use on presentation. The outcome measure was in-hospital mortality truncated at 30 days. An association between statin use and mortality was sought using logistic regression analysis.

Results:
Data were collected over a 60-week period from 2,642 admissions. Patients taking a statin on admission had a higher unadjusted mortality risk (odds ratio [OR] = 2.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.32 to 3.46) compared to those not on a statin. However, this result became nonsignificant (OR = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.55 to 1.69) after adjusting for age, severity of disease, comorbid status, and propensity score.

Conclusions: 
These data do not support an independent association between current preadmission statin use and lower 30-day in-hospital mortality in emergency patients admitted with infection. This result is contrary to most previously published studies.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article first published online: 11 February, 2011.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
Official 2012 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 4 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 4 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 22 Feb 2011, 16:39:07 EST by Sia Athanasas on behalf of School of Medicine