The impact of music and imagery on physical performance and arousal: Studies of coordination and endurance

Dorney, Lisa, Goh, Emil Kwan Ming and Lee, Christina (1992) The impact of music and imagery on physical performance and arousal: Studies of coordination and endurance. Journal of Sport Behavior, 15 1: 21-33.

Author Dorney, Lisa
Goh, Emil Kwan Ming
Lee, Christina
Title The impact of music and imagery on physical performance and arousal: Studies of coordination and endurance
Journal name Journal of Sport Behavior   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0162-7341
Publication date 1992-03
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 15
Issue 1
Start page 21
End page 33
Total pages 13
Place of publication Mobile, AL, U.S.A.
Publisher University of South Alabama, Department of Psychology
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Research examining the effects of music on behaviour is scarce, despite the ubiquity of music in the everyday lives of people of all cultures. Listening to music has been shown to influence emotional state, and its use as a preparation strategy is well known in sporting folklore, but has not been evaluated formally. This paper reports on two studies of the relationships between music, heart rate, and performance in physical tasks. In the first study, 30 subjects performed a dart-throwing task on three occasions: without music; after listening to slow classical music, and after listening to fast modern music. Performance did not differ across conditions, but heart rate was significantly lowered after listening to either type of music. In the second study, the possible relationship between music and imagery was examined by comparing preparation with imagery alone, or imagery plus music, for performance in a muscular endurance task. Task performance improved equally over baseline for both groups. The imagery-plus-music group showed a significant increase in heart rate during preparation, but heart rate was not related to task performance. It appears that music may affect arousal, but that for these tasks at least, there is no corresponding effect on behaviour. Further systematic research examining a broader range of tasks and types of music may indicate more about the psychological effects of music and their relevance to physical activity.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 22 Feb 2011, 15:59:12 EST by Christina Lee on behalf of School of Psychology