"This is not my home, this is council land": The meaning and aspirations of home for those without one.

Parsell, Cameron (2010). "This is not my home, this is council land": The meaning and aspirations of home for those without one.. In: William Randolph, Terry Burke, Kath Hulse and Vivienne Milligan, Refereed papers presented at the 4th Australasian Housing Researchers Conference. 4th Australasian Housing Researchers Conference (AHRC 2009), Sydney, NSW, Australia, (1-19). 5-7 August 2009.

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Author Parsell, Cameron
Title of paper "This is not my home, this is council land": The meaning and aspirations of home for those without one.
Conference name 4th Australasian Housing Researchers Conference (AHRC 2009)
Conference location Sydney, NSW, Australia
Conference dates 5-7 August 2009
Proceedings title Refereed papers presented at the 4th Australasian Housing Researchers Conference
Place of Publication Kensington, NSW, Australia
Publisher City Futures Research Centre
Publication Year 2010
Year available 2009
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 9781740440325
1740440323
Editor William Randolph
Terry Burke
Kath Hulse
Vivienne Milligan
Start page 1
End page 19
Total pages 19
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
The meaning of home is a well theorised area in contemporary housing research. Contributors to this field have highlighted how understanding what home is, requires an understanding of individual subjectivity. Home is a special place; people experience and understand home with reference to family, safety, security and autonomy. It is now widely agreed upon that home encompasses far more than housing. Drawing upon ethnographic fieldwork conducted in inner-city Brisbane, this study explores the meaning of home from the perspectives of people literally without shelter. This paper illustrates that those people living in ways deemed unconventional by both themselves and broader society, understand home as a safe and secure place where they can assert control. Contrary to romanticised portrayals of people experiencing public places in which they live as home, research participants in this study felt unambiguously homeless. They strongly desired ‘conventional’ homes. By understanding their day-to-day lives in public places as dangerous, constrained and exposed, people in this study’s aspirations for a ‘conventional’ home were contextualised. It was not simply powerful ‘normalising’ forces or socially imposed ideals that informed their aspirations for a home, but rather the deprivation and lived experiences as homeless. Moreover, this paper shows that people’s desires and aspirations for a home, were not only desires to participate in what they believed was mainstream society, but desires to have a ‘normal’ family life many had never experienced.
Keyword Home
Homelessness
Place
Belonging
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Presented during Workshop Theme W1 "Housing, Culture And Society" as Paper W1-09. Published May 2010.

 
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Created: Mon, 21 Feb 2011, 09:36:17 EST by Dr Cameron Parsell on behalf of School of Social Work and Human Services