Attention deficits after incident stroke in the acute period: Frequency across types of attention and relationships to patient characteristics and functional outcomes

Barker-Collo, Suzanne L., Feigin, Valery L., Lawes, Carlene M. M., Parag, Varsha and Senior, Hugh (2010) Attention deficits after incident stroke in the acute period: Frequency across types of attention and relationships to patient characteristics and functional outcomes. Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, 17 6: 463-476. doi:10.1310/tsr1706-463

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Author Barker-Collo, Suzanne L.
Feigin, Valery L.
Lawes, Carlene M. M.
Parag, Varsha
Senior, Hugh
Title Attention deficits after incident stroke in the acute period: Frequency across types of attention and relationships to patient characteristics and functional outcomes
Journal name Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1074-9357
1945-5119
Publication date 2010-11
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1310/tsr1706-463
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 17
Issue 6
Start page 463
End page 476
Total pages 14
Place of publication Leeds, W Yorks, United Kingdom
Publisher Maney Publishing
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background:  Attention deficits are common post stroke and result in poorer functional outcomes. This study examined the frequency of attention deficits after incident stroke and their correlates.

Method: Attention of 94 stroke survivors was assessed using the Bells test, Trails Making Test A/B, 2.4- and 2.0-second trials of the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT), and Integrated Auditory Visual Continuous Performance Test (IVA-CPT) within 3 weeks post stroke. Wider functioning was assessed using the Medical Short Form-36 (SF-36) Physical and Mental Component Summary scores (PCS and MCS), London Handicap Scale, Modified Rankin Scale, General Health Questionnaire-28, and Cognitive Failures Questionnaire (CFQ).

Results:  Most participants were impaired or very impaired on the IVA-CPT (z scores > 3 SDs below normative mean) but not other attention measures. Functional independence and cognitive screening test (Mini-Mental State Examination) performance were significantly related to IVA-CPT, Trails A/B, and Bells tests but not PASAT. Better performance across the Bells test was related to better SF-36 PCS, whereas Trails A and the PASAT were related to SF-36 MCS. Better CFQ naming was related to Trails B, whereas worse CFQ memory was related to better PASAT performance.

Conclusion:  
Attention deficits are common post stroke, though frequency varies widely across the forms of attention assessed, with tests of neglect and speeded attention tasks being linked to quality of life. This variability of performance and linking to wider outcomes suggests the need for comprehensive assessment of attention and that attention is a viable target for rehabilitative efforts. © 2010 Thomas Land Publishers, Inc.
Keyword Attention
Functional outcomes
Incident stroke
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online Friday, January 14, 2011.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 10 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 11 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Sun, 20 Feb 2011, 00:00:06 EST