Delivery styles and formats for different stroke information topics: Patient and carer preferences

Eames, Sally, Hoffmann, Tammy, Worrall, Linda and Read, Stephen (2011) Delivery styles and formats for different stroke information topics: Patient and carer preferences. Patient Education And Counseling, 84 2: e18-e23. doi:10.1016/j.pec.2010.07.007

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Author Eames, Sally
Hoffmann, Tammy
Worrall, Linda
Read, Stephen
Title Delivery styles and formats for different stroke information topics: Patient and carer preferences
Journal name Patient Education And Counseling   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0738-3991
Publication date 2011-08
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.pec.2010.07.007
Volume 84
Issue 2
Start page e18
End page e23
Total pages 6
Place of publication Princeton, NJ, U.S.A.
Publisher Excerpta Medica
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective:
To identify the preferences of patients with stroke and their carers for format and delivery style, of different categories of stroke information, and whether these preferences changed over time.

Methods:
A semi-structured questionnaire, designed to explore preferences for four topic categories was administered to 34 acute stroke unit patients and 18 carers prior to discharge and again, 3 months after discharge to 27 of these patients and 16 of these carers.

Results:
Overall format preferences were a combination of face-to-face, written and telephone for both patients and carers prior to discharge. This combination continued for carers following discharge, while patients preferred face-to-face, written and alternative formats of online and audiovisual at this time. Patients and carers most frequently preferred delivery styles appeared to be a mix of active and passive delivery styles, across all topics. Access to a telephone hotline was a popular delivery style.

Conclusion:

Patient and carer preferences varied, supporting the need to offer a variety of formats and delivery styles at each point of contact. Practice implications: By focusing on specific formats and delivery styles for different topics, health professionals may maximise the access to, and relevance of, stroke information for patients and their carers. © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keyword Carer
Education
Patient
Preferences
Stroke
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Available online 13 August, 2010.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Sat, 19 Feb 2011, 12:49:56 EST by Kathleen Reinhardt on behalf of School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences