Natural history of attention deficits and their influence on functional recovery from acute stages to 6 months after stroke

Barker-Collo, Suzanne, Feigin, Valery, Lawes, Carlene, Senior, Hugh and Parag, Varsha (2010) Natural history of attention deficits and their influence on functional recovery from acute stages to 6 months after stroke. Neuroepidemiology, 35 4: 255-262. doi:10.1159/000319894


Author Barker-Collo, Suzanne
Feigin, Valery
Lawes, Carlene
Senior, Hugh
Parag, Varsha
Title Natural history of attention deficits and their influence on functional recovery from acute stages to 6 months after stroke
Journal name Neuroepidemiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0251-5350
1423-0208
Publication date 2010-11-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1159/000319894
Volume 35
Issue 4
Start page 255
End page 262
Total pages 8
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publisher S. Karger
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Attention deficits are common after stroke, yet their natural course is undefined. This paper examines the course of recovery of attention up to 6 months after stroke. Also examined was the relationship of attention deficits to hemisphere of lesion and to wider outcomes (e.g. quality of life) 6 months after stroke. Methods: After stroke, 43 individuals completed attention tests (Trails A/B, Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test, Bells Test, Integrated Auditory Visual Continuous Performance Test) at baseline (within 4 weeks after stroke), 6 weeks and 6 months after stroke. Results: At baseline, 25-60% of attention test scores showed impairment. The sample was significantly disabled (Modified Rankin Scale, MRS), had poor quality of life (36-item short-form questionnaire of the Medical Outcomes Study, SF-36) and significant cognitive difficulties (Cognitive Failures Questionnaire). Visual alternating attention, auditory/visual sustained and alternating attention improved significantly across each time frame. Hemisphere of lesion was not significantly related to baseline attention or to degree of improvement (p > 0.05). However, it was noted that while left-hemisphere stroke was associated with improved Trails A performance at each assessment, right-hemisphere lesions improved from baseline to 6 weeks but declined from 6 weeks to 6 months. Improved physical outcomes (e.g. MRS) at 6 months were predicted from less severe stroke, while an improved SF-36 mental component score was best predicted from age. Cognitive ability was predicted from Trails A attention. While left-hemisphere stroke was associated with improved Trails A performance at each assessment, right-hemisphere lesions improved from baseline to 6 weeks but declined from 6 weeks to 6 months. Conclusions: The findings suggest that attention deficits, particularly with more complex forms of attention, are common acutely after stroke and that while they improve over time, they have a significant impact on wider aspects of functioning. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 18 Feb 2011, 23:13:59 EST by Dr Hugh Senior on behalf of School of Medicine