Maternal creatine supplementation from mid-pregnancy protects the diaphragm of the newborn spiny mouse from intrapartum hypoxia-induced damage

Cannata, DJ, Ireland, Z, Dickinson, H, Snow, RJ, Russell, AP, West, JM and Walker, DW (2010) Maternal creatine supplementation from mid-pregnancy protects the diaphragm of the newborn spiny mouse from intrapartum hypoxia-induced damage. Pediatric Research, 68 5: 393-398. doi:10.1203/PDR.0b013e3181f1c048


Author Cannata, DJ
Ireland, Z
Dickinson, H
Snow, RJ
Russell, AP
West, JM
Walker, DW
Title Maternal creatine supplementation from mid-pregnancy protects the diaphragm of the newborn spiny mouse from intrapartum hypoxia-induced damage
Journal name Pediatric Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0031-3998
Publication date 2010-11
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1203/PDR.0b013e3181f1c048
Volume 68
Issue 5
Start page 393
End page 398
Total pages 6
Place of publication United States
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Abstract We hypothesized that maternal creatine supplementation from mid-pregnancy would protect the diaphragm of the newborn spiny mouse from the effects of intrapartum hypoxia. Pregnant mice were fed a control or 5% creatine- supplemented diet from mid-gestation. On the day before term, intrapartum hypoxia was induced by isolating the pregnant uterus in a saline bath for 7.5-8 min before releasing and resuscitating the fetuses. Surviving pups were placed with a cross-foster dam, and diaphragm tissue was collected at 24 h postnatal age. Hypoxia caused a significant decrease in the cross-sectional area (∼19%) and contractile function (26.6% decrease in maximum Ca-activated force) of diaphragm fibers. The mRNA levels of the muscle mass-regulating genes MuRF1 and myostatin were significantly increased (2-fold). Maternal creatine significantly attenuated hypoxia-induced fiber atrophy, contractile dysfunction, and changes in mRNA levels. This study demonstrates that creatine loading before birth significantly protects the diaphragm from hypoxia-induced damage at birth. © 2010 International Pediatric Research Foundation, Inc.
Keyword Human skeletal muscle
Performance
Adaptations
Activation
Mechanisms
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
Non HERDC
 
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Created: Thu, 17 Feb 2011, 16:04:34 EST by Caroline Irle on behalf of UQ Centre for Clinical Research