The influence of self-efficacy and proficiency on EFL learners' writing

Rahimpour, Massoud and Nariman-Jahan, Roghayyeh (2010) The influence of self-efficacy and proficiency on EFL learners' writing. International Journal of Instructional Technology and Distance Learning, 7 11: 19-32.

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Nov_10.pdf HERDC Full text – not publicly available application/pdf 494.83KB 0
Author Rahimpour, Massoud
Nariman-Jahan, Roghayyeh
Title The influence of self-efficacy and proficiency on EFL learners' writing
Journal name International Journal of Instructional Technology and Distance Learning
ISSN 1550-6908
Publication date 2010-11-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 7
Issue 11
Start page 19
End page 32
Total pages 14
Editor Donald G. Perrin
Elizabeth Perrin
Place of publication Thousand Oaks, CA, U.S.A.
Publisher International Journal of Instructional Technology and Distance Learning
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The impetus of the present study was to investigate the impact of self-efficacy and proficiency on EFL learners‘ written task performance regarding concept load, fluency, complexity and accuracy. One hundred and forty four low-proficiency and high-proficiency learners of English as a foreign language, between ages 18-25, were chosen. Each participant was requested to execute three tasks: a narrative task, a personal task, and decision-making task and fill out the self-efficacy questionnaire. The participants‘ performances were then analyzed utilizing the Pearson correlation. The results demonstrated that there was a significant relationship between self-efficacy and narrative and personal tasks in terms of concept load but not in terms of fluency, complexity, and accuracy in high proficiency participants. Also, there was no relationship between self-efficacy and decision-making tasks in terms of concept load, fluency, complexity, and accuracy in both low and high proficiency participants.
Keyword Self-efficacy
Proficiency
Task type
Concept load
Fluency
Complexity
Accuracy
Writing performance
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes HERDC code should be C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Languages and Cultures Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Fri, 18 Feb 2011, 00:23:37 EST by Meredith Downes on behalf of School of Languages and Cultures