The prevalence and politics of HIV/AIDS in Zimbabwe: Examining the ideological, political and historical factors behind the 'decline'

O'Brien, Stephen and Broom, Alex (2010) The prevalence and politics of HIV/AIDS in Zimbabwe: Examining the ideological, political and historical factors behind the 'decline'. Politikon, 37 2-3: 311-330. doi:10.1080/02589346.2010.530448

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Author O'Brien, Stephen
Broom, Alex
Title The prevalence and politics of HIV/AIDS in Zimbabwe: Examining the ideological, political and historical factors behind the 'decline'
Journal name Politikon   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0258-9346
1470-1014
Publication date 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/02589346.2010.530448
Volume 37
Issue 2-3
Start page 311
End page 330
Total pages 20
Editor Pieter Fourie
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxon, U.K.
Publisher Routledge
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The reported reduction in the prevalence level of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) in Zimbabwe has been represented as one of the most significant and rapid declines within any population since the epidemic emerged as a public health issue. This paper explains how this development has been reported, challenged and eventually owned by many of the diverse stakeholders who constitute Zimbabwe's overall AIDS response. The Zimbabwean government has claimed that the decline was brought about due to its own efforts and resources. However, while the country has received considerably less AIDS funding than its neighbours, external donations still account for the vast bulk of AIDS spending in Zimbabwe. In addition, instead of collapsing, as some predicted, the Zimbabwean state can also claim that it has presided over increased availability of antiretroviral therapy. In this paper we examine how various internal and external stakeholders deployed strategic explanations in an attempt to take credit for 'the decline'; this is an important case study of how epidemiological data can be used to construct and contest political legitimacy.
© 2010 South African Association of Political Studies
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
School of Social Science Publications
 
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