Non-medical prescribing in Australasia and the UK: The case of podiatry

Borthwick, Alan M., Short, Anthony J., Nancarrow, Susan A. and Boyce, Rosalie A. (2010) Non-medical prescribing in Australasia and the UK: The case of podiatry. Journal of Foot and Ankle Research., 3 1: 1.1-1.10. doi:10.1186/1757-1146-3-1


Author Borthwick, Alan M.
Short, Anthony J.
Nancarrow, Susan A.
Boyce, Rosalie A.
Title Non-medical prescribing in Australasia and the UK: The case of podiatry
Journal name Journal of Foot and Ankle Research.   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1757-1146
Publication date 2010-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1186/1757-1146-3-1
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 3
Issue 1
Start page 1.1
End page 1.10
Total pages 10
Place of publication London, U.K.
Publisher BioMed Central
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: The last decade has witnessed a rapid transformation in the role boundaries of the allied health professions, enabled through the creation of new roles and the expansion of existing, traditional roles. A strategy of health care ‘modernisation’ has encompassed calls for the redrawing of professional boundaries and identities, linked with demands for greater workforce flexibility. Several tasks and roles previously within the exclusive domain of medicine have been delegated to, or assumed by, allied health professionals, as the workforce is reshaped to meet the challenges posed by changing demographic, social and political contexts. The prescribing of medicines by non-medically qualified healthcare professionals, and in particular the podiatry profession, reflects these changes.

Methods: Using a range of key primary documentary sources derived from published material in the public domain and unpublished material in private possession, this paper traces the development of contemporary UK and Australasian podiatric prescribing, access, supply and administration of medicines. Documentary sources include material from legislative, health policy, regulatory and professional bodies (including both State and Federal sources in Australia).

Results: Tracing a chronological, comparative, socio-historical account of the emergence and development of ‘prescribing’ in podiatry in both Australasia and the UK enables an analysis of the impact of health policy reforms on the use of, and access to, medicines by podiatrists. The advent of neo-liberal healthcare policies, coupled with demands for workforce flexibility and role transfer within a climate of demographic, economic and social change has enabled allied health professionals to undertake an expanding number of tasks involving the sale, supply, administration and prescription of medicines.

Conclusion: As a challenge to medical dominance, these changes, although driven by wider healthcare policy, have met with resistance. As anticipated in the theory of medical dominance, inter-professional jurisdictional disputes centred on the right to access, administer, supply and prescribe medicines act as obstacles to workforce change. Nevertheless, the broader policy agenda continues to ensure workforce redesign in which podiatry has assumed wider roles and responsibilities in prescribing.
Keyword Health care
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article number 1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Pharmacy Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 4 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 10 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 15 Feb 2011, 15:31:17 EST by Dr Rosalie Boyce on behalf of School of Pharmacy