A radiographic analysis of the influence of initial neck posture on cervical segmental movement at end-range extension in asymptomatic subjects

Takasaki, Hiroshi, Hall, Toby, Kaneko, Shouta, Ikemoto, Yoshikazu and Jull, Gwendolen (2011) A radiographic analysis of the influence of initial neck posture on cervical segmental movement at end-range extension in asymptomatic subjects. Manual Therapy, 16 1: 74-79.


Author Takasaki, Hiroshi
Hall, Toby
Kaneko, Shouta
Ikemoto, Yoshikazu
Jull, Gwendolen
Title A radiographic analysis of the influence of initial neck posture on cervical segmental movement at end-range extension in asymptomatic subjects
Journal name Manual Therapy   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1356-689X
1532-2769
Publication date 2011-02
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.math.2010.07.005
Volume 16
Issue 1
Start page 74
End page 79
Total pages 6
Place of publication Kidlington, Dorset, U.K.
Publisher Churchill Livingstone
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract In the management of neck pain disorders, McKenzie recommends performing neck extension exercises from a fully neck retracted position in order to achieve a maximum range of lower cervical extension. However, no study has investigated the impact of pre-positioning the neck prior to the extension exercise. This study compared end-range sagittal cervical segmental rotation and translation from three starting positions: the neck in neutral (Ex), retraction (Ret-Ex) and protraction (Pro-Ex). Twenty asymptomatic healthy volunteers were recruited. Lateral radiographs were taken in neutral and at each of the three end-range extension positions and differences in sagittal rotation angles and translation from the neck neutral posture were calculated at each segment. The results indicated that there was a significant difference in the pattern of the sagittal segmental rotation (P < 0.001) but no difference in summed rotations (total extension) between the three conditions (P > 0.05). Pro-Ex generated significantly (P < 0.05) greater extension range at C1–2 and Ret-Ex produced significantly (P < 0.05) greater extension range at C6–7 than alternate conditions. In contrast, there was no significant difference in segmental translation values between the three conditions (P > 0.05). These results indicate initial neck positions can influence cervical segmental extension range at C1–2 and C6–7.
© 2010 Elsevier Ltd.
Keyword Extension
McKenzie
Neck
Segmental movement
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Available online 12 August, 2010.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 11 Feb 2011, 15:31:49 EST by Kathleen Reinhardt on behalf of School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences