Stakeholders and the state in the initial phases of the WorkChoices industrial relations reforms

Colley, Linda (2007). Stakeholders and the state in the initial phases of the WorkChoices industrial relations reforms. In: Proceedings of the 14th International Employment Relations Association Conference. 14th International Employment Relations Association Conference, Hong Kong, (1-22). 19-23 June 2006.

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Author Colley, Linda
Title of paper Stakeholders and the state in the initial phases of the WorkChoices industrial relations reforms
Conference name 14th International Employment Relations Association Conference
Conference location Hong Kong
Conference dates 19-23 June 2006
Proceedings title Proceedings of the 14th International Employment Relations Association Conference
Place of Publication Hong Kong
Publisher Hong Kong Baptist University
Publication Year 2007
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 9789628526499
Start page 1
End page 22
Total pages 22
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Australia is in the midst of far-reaching industrial relations reforms, which overturn a century of centralised conciliation and arbitration and traditions of a level playing field for players in the industrial relations arena. While the content of the legislation is perplexing, the process of its introduction is equally so. This paper focuses on the seven-month period from the federal election in October 2004 until 26th May 2005, when John Howard finally made a formal policy statement to Parliament on the next wave of industrial relations reform. First, the paper draws on some theories to examine policy processes, pressure groups and state intervention in industrial relations. Then it reviews the informal hints and announcements from Howard Government representatives and the resultant lobbying by interested parties. Information is drawn from a range of primary sources, including public announcements, media reports, and an independent industrial relations news service (Workplace Express). It concludes that the Howard Government had a set agenda of reform, and its direction did not appear to be altered in any manner amidst criticism from opponents (such as unions and opposition political parties) and occasionally from supporters, in the period up until the formal policy announcement.
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Institute for Social Science Research - Publications
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Created: Wed, 09 Feb 2011, 22:46:29 EST by Dr Linda Colley on behalf of Institute for Social Science Research