Behavior Trees: From systems engineering to software engineering

Lindsay, Peter A. (2010). Behavior Trees: From systems engineering to software engineering. In: Software Engineering and Formal Methods, SEFM 2010. 8th IEEE International Conference on Software Engineering and Formal Methods, SEFM 2010, Pisa, Italy, (21-30). 13-18 September 2010. doi:10.1109/SEFM.2010.11

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Author Lindsay, Peter A.
Title of paper Behavior Trees: From systems engineering to software engineering
Conference name 8th IEEE International Conference on Software Engineering and Formal Methods, SEFM 2010
Conference location Pisa, Italy
Conference dates 13-18 September 2010
Proceedings title Software Engineering and Formal Methods, SEFM 2010
Journal name Proceedings - Software Engineering and Formal Methods, SEFM 2010
Place of Publication Los Alamitos, CA, United States
Publisher IEEE Computer Society
Publication Year 2010
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.1109/SEFM.2010.11
Open Access Status
ISBN 9780769541532
ISSN 978-1-4244-8289-4
Start page 21
End page 30
Total pages 10
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Geoff Dromey's Behavior Engineering method provides a vital link between systems engineering processes and software engineering processes. It has proven particularly effective in industry when applied to large complex systems, to help understand the problem space and clarify system and software requirements. In this paper we compare the method with some of the most widely used system design methods, including State Transition Diagrams, Functional Flow Block Diagrams, Object Oriented Design, IDEF0, UML and SysML. The comparison draws on the Design-Methods Comparison Project undertaken by Bahill et al in 1998, and uses their Traffic Lights case study. We show that the methods are roughly equivalent in terms of what they can express, but that Behavior Trees come closest to natural language specification, which we contend makes them easier for non-formal methods experts to understand. © 2010 IEEE.
Keyword Behavior Trees
Formal methods
System design methods
System modelling
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Session 1: Special Track in Memory of Geoff Dromey

 
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Created: Wed, 09 Feb 2011, 13:44:06 EST by Dr Kirsten Winter on behalf of School of Information Technol and Elec Engineering