Spike-time robotics: A rapid response circuit for a robot that seeks temporally varying stimuli

Ball, David, Heath, Scott, Nolan, Chris, Stratton, Peter and Wiles, Janet (2010). Spike-time robotics: A rapid response circuit for a robot that seeks temporally varying stimuli. In: Kok Wai Wong, B. Sumudu U. Mendis and Abdesselam Bouzerdoum, Neural Information Processing. Theory and Algorithms: ICONIP 2010, Proceedings. ICONIP 2010 - 17th International Conference on Neural Information Processing, Sydney, Australia, (). 22-25 November 2010.

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Ball, David
Heath, Scott
Nolan, Chris
Stratton, Peter
Wiles, Janet
Title of paper Spike-time robotics: A rapid response circuit for a robot that seeks temporally varying stimuli
Conference name ICONIP 2010 - 17th International Conference on Neural Information Processing
Conference location Sydney, Australia
Conference dates 22-25 November 2010
Proceedings title Neural Information Processing. Theory and Algorithms: ICONIP 2010, Proceedings   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Lecture Notes in Computer Science   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher Springer
Publication Year 2010
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status
ISBN 9783642175367
ISSN 0302-9743
1611-3349
Editor Kok Wai Wong
B. Sumudu U. Mendis
Abdesselam Bouzerdoum
Total pages 10
Language eng
Abstract/Summary In this paper we describe a spiking neural circuit inspired by the pyramidal-interneuron network gamma (PING) circuit modeled by Whittington and colleagues [1]. The spiking network controls a rat animat – a rodent-inspired robot that can autonomously explore and map its environment. We demonstrate how the neural controller directs the rat animat‟s movement towards temporal stimuli of the appropriate frequency using an approach based on Braitenberg Vehicles. The circuit responds robustly (after four cycles) when first detecting a light pulsing at 1 Hz, and rapidly (after one-to-three cycles) when primed by recent experiences with the same frequency. This study is the first to demonstrate a biologically-inspired spike-based robot that is both robust and rapid in detecting and responding to temporal dynamics in the environment. It provides the basis for further studies of biologically-inspired spike-based robotics.
Keyword Spiking neural networks
Resonating circuits
Autonomous robotics
Rat animat
Braitenberg Vehicles
Neurorobotics
Spike-time robotics
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Neural Information Processing. Theory and Algorithms 17th International Conference, ICONIP 2010, Sydney, Australia, November 22-25, 2010, Proceedings, Part I. Published in Book Series Lecture Notes in Computer Science. Related Links

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 09 Feb 2011, 13:33:55 EST by Dr David Ball on behalf of School of Information Technol and Elec Engineering