They may play up but it's your fault: The attributions toward other customers

Tombs, Alastair G. and McColl-Kennedy, Janet R. (2010). They may play up but it's your fault: The attributions toward other customers. In: ANZMAC 2010 Book of Abstracts. Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference [ANZMAC], Christchurch, N.Z., (1-1). 29 November-1 December 2010.

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Author Tombs, Alastair G.
McColl-Kennedy, Janet R.
Title of paper They may play up but it's your fault: The attributions toward other customers
Conference name Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference [ANZMAC]
Conference location Christchurch, N.Z.
Conference dates 29 November-1 December 2010
Proceedings title ANZMAC 2010 Book of Abstracts
Place of Publication Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Publisher Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy (ANZMAC)
Publication Year 2010
Sub-type Published abstract
ISSN 1447-3275
Start page 1
End page 1
Total pages 1
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Imagine you are in a restaurant and someone at another table becomes disruptive. This paper examines the customers’ reactions and responses to situations such as this. It is widely acknowledged that the behaviour of other customers may cause service failures (Bougie, Pieters, and Zeelenberg, 2003; McColl-Kennedy and Sparks, 2003) or enhance the service experience (Arnould and Price, 1993). Yet, it is surprising that little has been done to discover if this influence is a direct result of the individual customer’s affective reaction to the environment or whether it is a reaction that follows some form of cognition relating to the causal attributions. This paper therefore, seeks to fill this important gap by using Attribution Theory to investigate and explain the social influence of customers on other customers within the servicescape.
Subjects 1505 Marketing
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Presented during the Track "Services [Part 2 of 7]", Session 3.6 "Complaints/Recovery" as Paper 00390.

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Non HERDC
UQ Business School Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 07 Feb 2011, 17:49:58 EST by Dr Alastair Tombs on behalf of UQ Business School