Cardiorespiratory synchronization during sigh with and without post-sigh central apnea in healthy sleeping infants

Nguyen, C., Dakin, C., Yuill, M. and Wilson, S. (2010). Cardiorespiratory synchronization during sigh with and without post-sigh central apnea in healthy sleeping infants. In: Sleep DownUnder 2010: Biodiversity of Sleep. Australian Sleep Association and Australian Sleep Technologists Association 22nd Annual Scientific Meeting. Australian Sleep Association and Australian Sleep Technologists Association 22nd Annual Scientific Meeting, Christchurch Convention Centre, New Zealand, (A66-A66). 21st - 23rd October 2010. doi:10.1111/j.1479-8425.2010.00457_1.x

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
asm_paper.pdf asm_paper.pdf application/pdf 1.44MB 55

Author Nguyen, C.
Dakin, C.
Yuill, M.
Wilson, S.
Title of paper Cardiorespiratory synchronization during sigh with and without post-sigh central apnea in healthy sleeping infants
Conference name Australian Sleep Association and Australian Sleep Technologists Association 22nd Annual Scientific Meeting
Conference location Christchurch Convention Centre, New Zealand
Conference dates 21st - 23rd October 2010
Proceedings title Sleep DownUnder 2010: Biodiversity of Sleep. Australian Sleep Association and Australian Sleep Technologists Association 22nd Annual Scientific Meeting   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Sleep and Biological Rhythms   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Richmond, VIC, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Publication Year 2010
Sub-type Poster
DOI 10.1111/j.1479-8425.2010.00457_1.x
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
ISSN 1446-9235
1479-8425
Volume 8
Issue Supplement S1
Start page A66
End page A66
Total pages 1
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Introduction: Sighs (deep inspirations) are thought to have an important
role in restoring lung volume, resetting the mechanical properties
of lung tissue and in changing neurorespiratory control. Especially, in
quiet or non-rapid eye movement sleep, sighs may be followed by
central apnea. Sighs reduce in frequency with maturation over the fi rst
year of life. We speculated that strength of cardiorespiratory synchronization
(CS) and direction of cardiorespiratory coupling (DC), as a
measure of neurorespiratory control, would differ before and after sigh,
and between sighs with and without central apnea, and that there would
be a maturational effect.
Methodology: CS and DC were assessed by a phase dynamics method
preceding and following sigh (with and without central apnea) in 15
healthy infants at 2 weeks, 3 months and 6 months of age. The CS
index varied from 0 (unsynchronized) to 1 (perfectly synchronized).
The DC index varies from −1 (if the direction of coupling is from respiration
to heart rate) to 1 (in the opposite directional coupling from
heart rate to respiration), and −1 < DC index < 1 indicates bidirectional
coupling.
Results and discussion: Our results show a signifi cant decrease in CS
and respiratory modulation on heart rate (RMH) (interpreted by “negative”
DC index) prior to sighs with central apnea compared to sighs
alone. Prior to a sigh, CS index was lower with sigh followed by central
apnea (0.58, 0.66, 0.64 at 2 weeks, 3 months and 6 months of age,
respectively) than with sigh alone (0.63, 0.71, 0.76, respectively). On
the other hand, prior to a sigh, DC index was higher with sigh followed
by central apnea (−0.45, −0.67, −0.77 at 2 weeks, 3 months and
6 months of age, respectively) than with sigh alone from (−0.50, −0.79,
−0.80, respectively). We found that RMH increased after a sigh (with
or without central apnea), suggesting the involvement of sighs in regulation
and resetting of the neurorespiratory controller. Using neonatal
data as a reference, CS and RMH increased at 3 months and further
increased at 6 months of age. The greatest change was observed between
2 weeks and 3 months of age.
Conclusion: CS in infants changes with maturation and is different
before a sigh with and without central apnea as well as changes before
and after a sigh, suggesting a neuroregulatory role of sigh.
Q-Index Code CX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Poster Presentations No. P106. Special Issue: Sleep Down Under 2010 - Biodiversity of Sleep.

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Thu, 03 Feb 2011, 22:55:12 EST by Mr Chinh Nguyen on behalf of School of Information Technol and Elec Engineering