An investigation of the stress-buffering effects of social support in the occupational stress process as a function of team identification

Jimmieson, NL, McKimmie, BM, Hannam, RL and Gallagher, J (2010) An investigation of the stress-buffering effects of social support in the occupational stress process as a function of team identification. Group Dynamics, 14 4: 350-367. doi:10.1037/a0018631

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Author Jimmieson, NL
McKimmie, BM
Hannam, RL
Gallagher, J
Title An investigation of the stress-buffering effects of social support in the occupational stress process as a function of team identification
Journal name Group Dynamics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1089-2699
1930-7802
Publication date 2010-12
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1037/a0018631
Volume 14
Issue 4
Start page 350
End page 367
Total pages 18
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher American Psychological Association
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Abstract This study explored how the social context influences the stress-buffering effects of social support on employee adjustment. It was anticipated that the positive relationship between support from colleagues and employee adjustment would be more marked for those strongly identifying with their work team. Furthermore, as part of a three-way interactive effect, it was predicted that high identification would increase the efficacy of coworker support as a buffer of two role stressors (role overload and role ambiguity). One hundred and 55 employees recruited from first-year psychology courses enrolled at two Australian universities were surveyed. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses revealed that the negative main effect of role ambiguity on job satisfaction was significant for those employees with low levels of team identification, whereas high team identifiers were buffered from the deleterious effect of role ambiguity on job satisfaction. There also was a significant interaction between coworker support and team identification. The positive effect of coworker support on job satisfaction was significant for high team identifiers, whereas coworker support was not a source of satisfaction for those employees with low levels of team identification. A three-way interaction emerged among the focal variables in the prediction of psychological well-being, suggesting that the combined benefits of coworker support and team identification under conditions of high demand may be limited and are more likely to be observed when demands are low. © 2010 American Psychological Association.
Keyword Workplace stressors
Social support
Team identification
Employee adjustment
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 23 Jan 2011, 00:05:08 EST