Interpretations of human body density: The distribution of body fat in relation to activity

Brown, Wendy J. and Jones, P.R.M. (1977). Interpretations of human body density: The distribution of body fat in relation to activity. In: Annals of Human Biology. Proceedings of the Society for the Study of Human Biology, Hospital for Sick Children, Great Ormond Street, London, U.K., (383-383). 15 April 1977.


Author Brown, Wendy J.
Jones, P.R.M.
Title of paper Interpretations of human body density: The distribution of body fat in relation to activity
Conference name Proceedings of the Society for the Study of Human Biology
Conference location Hospital for Sick Children, Great Ormond Street, London, U.K.
Conference dates 15 April 1977
Proceedings title Annals of Human Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Annals of Human Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
Publication Year 1977
Sub-type Published abstract
ISSN 0301-4460
Volume 4
Issue 4
Start page 383
End page 383
Total pages 1
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Human body density may be predicted from skinfold measurements, and among the predictive equations most commonly used in the United Kingdom are those proposed by Durnin and Womersley (1969, 1974). It has been suggested by these workers that observed differences in the intercepts of the regression lines of the body density on the logarithm of the sum of four skinfolds, between men and women and between different age groups, may be explained in part by differences in the distribution of fat between internal and subcutaneous stores.
   We have examined the same relationship within a small group of young female subjects accustomed to different levels of habitual physical activity. The findings indicate that the relationship is affected by levels of habitual activity, and that this observation might be explained by variations in fat distribution. This has been examined by an empirical estimation of the proportion of total body fat which is situated subcutaneously in each subject. The results suggest that different levels
of habitual physical activity may lead to variations in the composition of the fat-free mass, which has implications.

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Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 07 Jan 2011, 01:16:01 EST