Strategy use of children with Down syndrome in a delay of gratification situation

Cuskelly, M, Gilmore, L, Jobling, A and Glenn, S (2009). Strategy use of children with Down syndrome in a delay of gratification situation. In: Special issue: 2nd IASSID Asia-Pacific Regional Conference. 2nd IASSID Asia-Pacific Regional Conference, Singapore, (101-102). 24-27 June 2009.

Author Cuskelly, M
Gilmore, L
Jobling, A
Glenn, S
Title of paper Strategy use of children with Down syndrome in a delay of gratification situation
Conference name 2nd IASSID Asia-Pacific Regional Conference
Conference location Singapore
Conference dates 24-27 June 2009
Proceedings title Special issue: 2nd IASSID Asia-Pacific Regional Conference   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Hoboken, NJ, United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Publication Year 2009
Sub-type Published abstract
ISSN 1741-1122
1741-1130
Volume 6
Issue 2
Start page 101
End page 102
Total pages 1
Language eng
Abstract/Summary The capacity to delay gratification has been shown to be a very important developmental task for children who are developing typically. There is evidence that children with Down syndrome have more difficulty with a delay of gratification task than typically developing children of the same mental age. This study focused on the strategies children with Down syndrome use while in a delay of gratification situation to ascertain if these contribute to the differences in delay times from those of typically developing children. Method Thirty-two children with Down syndrome (15 females) and 50 typically developing children participated in the study. Children with Down syndrome had a mental age, as measured by the Stanford-Binet IV, between 36 and 66 months (M = 45.66). The typically developing children had a mean chronological age of 45.76 months. Children participated in a delay of gratification task where they were offered two or one small treats and asked which they preferred. They were then told that they could have the two treats if they waited for the researcher to return (an undisclosed time of 15 min). If they did not want to wait any longer they could call the researcher back but then they could have only one treat. Twenty-two of the children with Down syndrome and 43 of the typically developing children demonstrated understanding of the task and their data are included here. Sessions were videotaped for later analysis. Results There were significant differences in the mean waiting times of the two groups. The mean of the waiting times for children with Down syndrome was 181.32 s (SD = 347.62) and was 440.21 s (SD = 377.59) for the typically developing children. Eighteen percent of the group with Down syndrome waited for the researcher to return in comparison to 35% of the typically developing groups. Sixty-four percent of children with Down syndrome called the researcher back and the remainder (18%) violated. In the typically developing group 37% called the researcher back and 28% violated. The mean waiting time for the group of children with Down syndrome who called the researcher back was 24 s. Examination of strategy use in this group was therefore very limited. There appeared to be quite similar strategy use across the groups who waited the full 15 min. Conclusions These results confirm the difficulty children with Down syndrome have in delaying gratification. Teaching strategies for waiting, using information drawn from the behaviors of children who are developing typically may be a useful undertaking. Examination of other contributors to delay ability (e.g., language skills) is also likely to be helpful in understanding the difficulties demonstrated in delaying gratification.
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 26 Dec 2010, 00:06:31 EST