Food risks, old and new demographic characteristics and perceptions of food additives, regulation and contamination in Australia

Buchler, Sandra, Smith, Kiah and Lawrence, Geoffrey (2010) Food risks, old and new demographic characteristics and perceptions of food additives, regulation and contamination in Australia. Journal of Sociology, 46 4: 353-374. doi:10.1177/1440783310384449

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Author Buchler, Sandra
Smith, Kiah
Lawrence, Geoffrey
Title Food risks, old and new demographic characteristics and perceptions of food additives, regulation and contamination in Australia
Journal name Journal of Sociology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1440-7833
Publication date 2010-11-23
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/1440783310384449
Volume 46
Issue 4
Start page 353
End page 374
Total pages 22
Place of publication London, England
Publisher Sage
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Abstract New forms of food production, processing and distribution have resulted in rising consumer concern over food safety and quality. This study draws upon data from an Australia-wide survey to evaluate whether consumer perceptions towards various types of food risks differ according to demographic factors. This study has two distinct foci: those concerned with new, and those concerned with traditional, food risks. First, we investigate attitudes and concerns towards food additives and food regulation, characterized by new risks associated with chemicals, pesticides and food additives, as well as industry safeguards and issues of regulation in regard to these modern factors. Second, we consider more traditional types of risk associated with food contamination, such as spoilage and being past the used-by date. Our research suggests that if the risk in question is traditional, preventable and specific knowledge is required in order to avoid it, people who earn less than $25,000 per year, those who have not completed high school and religious people tend to be more concerned. In contrast, if the risk is modern, affects everyone equally, and the effects are not obvious or immediate, women, people with more education and older people tend to be more concerned. This study supports previous research which shows that various groups within society understand and respond to food safety risks differently. © 2010 The Australian Sociological Association.
Keyword Australia
Demographic
Food safety
Modern risk
Risk
Traditional risk
Safety knowledge
Consumer
Health
Determinants
Information
Population
Discourses
Attitudes
Accounts
System
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Social Science Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 10 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 18 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Sun, 26 Dec 2010, 00:03:59 EST