The impact of Pleistocene changes of climate and landscape on Australian birds: a test using the Pied Butcherbird (Cracticus nigrogularis)

Kearns, Anna M., Joseph, Leo and Cook, Lyn G. (2010) The impact of Pleistocene changes of climate and landscape on Australian birds: a test using the Pied Butcherbird (Cracticus nigrogularis). Emu, 110 4: 285-295. doi:10.1071/MU10020


Author Kearns, Anna M.
Joseph, Leo
Cook, Lyn G.
Title The impact of Pleistocene changes of climate and landscape on Australian birds: a test using the Pied Butcherbird (Cracticus nigrogularis)
Journal name Emu   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0158-4197
1448-5540
Publication date 2010-10-28
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/MU10020
Volume 110
Issue 4
Start page 285
End page 295
Total pages 11
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic, Australia
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Abstract Widespread cyclic aridity during the Pleistocene is hypothesised to have had a significant impact on widespread Australian birds causing range-wide contractions to historical refugia and population differentiation while in isolation. In this study we tested a priori hypotheses for the impact of Pleistocene climatic and edaphic changes on the population history of the widespread Australian Pied Butcherbird (Cracticus nigrogularis). Analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequences from 55 individuals of C. nigrogularis revealed low genetic diversity, poor geographical structure and signatures of a recent demographic expansion. In contrast with long-standing biogeographical hypotheses, our data suggest that C. nigrogularis was likely to have been restricted to multiple refugia across its current range rather than undergoing range-wide contractions to one or few refugia. In addition, we found no evidence for the Carpentarian Barrier of northern Australia having limited dispersal in C. nigrogularis, which contrasts with predictions from intraspecific taxonomy and with population structures of several other bird species. Our data add to the increasing number of phylogeographical studies of widespread Australian birds that show evidence of maintaining large effective population sizes despite widespread aridity, as well as species-specific, rather than ecosystem-wide, responses to Pleistocene climatic changes and biogeographical barriers. © Royal Australasian Ornithologists Union 2010.
Keyword Aves
Carpentarian Gap
Corvoidea
Intraspecific Divergence
Phylogeography
Population Bottlenecks
North-American Songbird
Mitochondrial-DNA
Population History
Divergence Times
Statistical Phylogeography
Evolutionary History
Monsoon Tropics
Gene Trees
Speciation
Biogeography
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 19 Dec 2010, 00:14:11 EST