Chemical detoxification vs mechanical removal of host plant toxins in Eucalyptus feeding sawfly larvae (Hymenoptera: Pergidae)

Schmidt, S., McKinnon, A. E., Moore, C. J. and Walter, G. H. (2010) Chemical detoxification vs mechanical removal of host plant toxins in Eucalyptus feeding sawfly larvae (Hymenoptera: Pergidae). Journal of Insect Physiology, 56 12: 1770-1776. doi:10.1016/j.jinsphys.2010.07.006


Author Schmidt, S.
McKinnon, A. E.
Moore, C. J.
Walter, G. H.
Title Chemical detoxification vs mechanical removal of host plant toxins in Eucalyptus feeding sawfly larvae (Hymenoptera: Pergidae)
Formatted title
Chemical detoxification vs mechanical removal of host plant toxins in Eucalyptus feeding sawfly larvae (Hymenoptera: Pergidae)
Journal name Journal of Insect Physiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-1910
1879-1611
Publication date 2010-12
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jinsphys.2010.07.006
Volume 56
Issue 12
Start page 1770
End page 1776
Total pages 7
Place of publication Oxford, U.K.
Publisher Pergamon
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The essential oils that characterize the eucalypts and related Myrtaceae pose a challenge for herbivores. Phytophagous insects that feed on oil-rich Myrtaceae have developed specific mechanisms to deal with these oils, some of which are notoriously toxic (e.g. 1,8-cineole). Some of the eight Australian subfamilies in the sawfly family Pergidae are associated exclusively with Eucalyptus and Melaleuca species that often have high concentrations of essential oils. Unexpectedly, the Perginae and Pterygophorinae use different mechanisms to deal with the same toxic components in their respective host plants. Larvae of the Perginae have the inner surface of their mandibles equipped with soft brush-like structures that are unique among phytophagous insects in general. The proposed role of these ancillary mandibular structures in separating leaf oils from nutritive plant matter could be confirmed in experiments with larvae of two pergine species. The oil sequestration is, however, incomplete and chemical gut content analyses by gas-chromatography (GC) revealed that 1,8-cineole does enter the midgut and is metabolised to hydroxycineole. Although the related Pterygophorinae also feed mainly on oil-rich Myrtaceae, they do not sequester the oil and lackmorphological structures on their mandibles. Chemical analysis of the gut content of two pterygophorine species showed that they rely solely on chemical detoxification of the relevant plant compounds, with GC demonstrating that the 1,8-cineole is removed far more rapidly and completely than in the pergine species.
© 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keyword Phytophagous insects
Leaf oil metabolism
1 8-cineole
Morphological adaptation
Behaviour
Melaleuca quinquenervia
Essential oils
1,8-cineole
Insects
Coleoptera
Toxicity
Constituent
Metabolism
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 19 Dec 2010, 00:09:42 EST