Multi-scaled habitat considerations for conserving urban biodiversity: Native reptiles and small mammals in Brisbane, Australia

Garden, Jenni, McAlpine, Clive and Possingham, Hugh (2010) Multi-scaled habitat considerations for conserving urban biodiversity: Native reptiles and small mammals in Brisbane, Australia. Landscape Ecology, 25 7: 113-128. doi:10.1007/s10980-010-9476-z


Author Garden, Jenni
McAlpine, Clive
Possingham, Hugh
Title Multi-scaled habitat considerations for conserving urban biodiversity: Native reptiles and small mammals in Brisbane, Australia
Journal name Landscape Ecology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0921-2973
1572-9761
Publication date 2010-04-10
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10980-010-9476-z
Volume 25
Issue 7
Start page 113
End page 128
Total pages 16
Editor Jianguo Wu
Place of publication Dordrecht , Netherlands
Publisher Kluwer
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The rapid expansion of the world's urban population is a major driver of contemporary landscape change and ecosystem modification. Urbanisation destroys, degrades and fragments native ecosystems, replacing them with a heterogeneous matrix of urban development, parks, roads, and isolated remnant fragments of varying size and quality. This presents a major challenge for biodiversity conservation within urban areas. To make spatially explicit decisions about urban biodiversity conservation actions, urban planners and managers need to be able to separate the relative influence of landscape composition and configuration from patch and local (site)-scale variables for a range of fauna species. We address this problem using a hierarchical landscape approach for native, terrestrial reptiles and small mammals living in a fragmented semi-urban landscape of Brisbane, Australia. Generalised linear modelling and hierarchical partitioning analysis were applied to quantify the relative influence of landscape composition and configuration, patch size and shape, and local habitat composition and structure on the species' richness of mammal and reptile assemblages. Landscape structure (composition and configuration) and local-scale habitat structure variables were found to be most important for influencing reptile and mammal assemblages, although the relative importance of specific variables differed between reptile and mammal assemblages. These findings highlight the importance of considering landscape composition and configuration in addition to local habitat elements when planning and/or managing for the conservation of native, terrestrial fauna diversity in urban landscapes.
© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010.
Keyword Landscape composition
Landscape configuration
Spatial modelling
Structural complexity
Urban planning
Patch isolation metrics
Extinction threshold
Landscape
Conservation
Fragmentation
Models
Vertebrates
Ecology
Birds
Roads
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management Publications
Official 2011 Collection
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 24 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 30 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Fri, 17 Dec 2010, 14:48:51 EST by Dr Clive Mcalpine on behalf of School of Geography, Planning & Env Management