Managing medical advice seeking in calls to child health line

Butler, Carly W., Danby, Susan, Emmison, Michael and Thorpe, Karen (2010). Managing medical advice seeking in calls to child health line. In Alison Pilnick, Jon Hindmarsh and Virginia Teas Gill (Ed.), Communication in healthcare settings: Policy participation and new technologies (pp. 31-47) United Kingdom: Wiley-Blackwell.

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Author Butler, Carly W.
Danby, Susan
Emmison, Michael
Thorpe, Karen
Title of chapter Managing medical advice seeking in calls to child health line
Title of book Communication in healthcare settings: Policy participation and new technologies
Place of Publication United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Publication Year 2010
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
Year available 2010
ISBN 9781405198271
Editor Alison Pilnick
Jon Hindmarsh
Virginia Teas Gill
Chapter number 3
Start page 31
End page 47
Total pages 17
Total chapters 9
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Child Health Line is a 24-hour Australian helpline that offers information and support for parents and families on child development and parenting. The helpline guidelines suggest that nurses should not offer medical advice; they do, however, regularly receive calls seeking such advice. This paper examines how the service guidelines are talked into being through the nurses’ management of callers’ requests for medical advice and information, and shows how nurses orient to the boundaries of their professional role and institutionally regulated authority. Three ways in which the child health nurses manage medical advice and information seeking are discussed: using membership as a nurse to establish boundaries of expertise, privileging parental authority regarding decision making about seeking treatment for their child, and respecifying a ‘medical’ problem as a child development issue. The paper contributes to research on medical authority, and nurse authority in particular, by demonstrating the impact of institutional roles and guidelines on displays of knowledge and expertise. More generally, it contributes to an understanding of the interactional enactment and consequences of service guidelines for telehealth practice, with implications for training, policy and service delivery.
Keyword Telehealth
Nurse
Child Health
Policy
Conversation analysis
Q-Index Code B1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published Online: 19 August, 2010.

 
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Created: Fri, 17 Dec 2010, 14:48:21 EST by Debbie Lim on behalf of School of Social Science