Paying attention to language: A neurological and behavioural examination of the impact of visual cueing on language performance

Cardell, E. A., Copland, D. and Greig, C. (2008). Paying attention to language: A neurological and behavioural examination of the impact of visual cueing on language performance. In: HCSNet SummerFest 2008, Sydney, Australia, (). 22-24 September 2008.

Author Cardell, E. A.
Copland, D.
Greig, C.
Title of paper Paying attention to language: A neurological and behavioural examination of the impact of visual cueing on language performance
Conference name HCSNet SummerFest 2008
Conference location Sydney, Australia
Conference dates 22-24 September 2008
Publication Year 2008
Sub-type Other
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Research suggests that attentional processes play a significant role in language and communication in healthy adults. When attentional systems are compromised, language errors ensue. Studies in healthy adults indicate that manipulating visual attention assists with visual target detection and linguistic tasks. Aphasia is a language disorder, usually caused by stroke, affecting both expressive and receptive language abilities. Adults with aphasia have significant delays in reaction times compared to healthy controls. However, no research has yet examined the beneficial effects of attentional manipulation on linguistic performance in this population. The aim of this study is therefore to further define the cognitive underpinnings of language performance in healthy adults and to investigate how attention may be positively manipulated in adults with aphasia. Valid, invalid and neutral visual cues will direct attention either covertly or overtly to the appropriate visual field. In one condition, a target will be presented and response time recorded, and in another condition, a picture will be presented to be named. The performance of healthy adults, healthy adults under attentional duress and adults with aphasia will be compared. Whilst undertaking the tasks, electrical changes in the brain will be monitored using electroencephalography. This will allow us to compare brain areas and the temporal processes involved in naming during the various cueing and loaded/unloaded attention conditions. The expected outcomes of this project are behavioural and electrophysiological details of the relationship between language and attention in healthy adults/adults with aphasia. This information will be used to develop a computerised treatment program.
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 17 Dec 2010, 14:16:22 EST by Dr Elizabeth Cardell on behalf of School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences