Survival: how the landscape impacts on people

Pocock, Celmara (2010) Survival: how the landscape impacts on people. Queensland Historical Atlas: Histories, Cultures, Landscapes, 2009-2010 .

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Pocock, Celmara
Title Survival: how the landscape impacts on people
Journal name Queensland Historical Atlas: Histories, Cultures, Landscapes
ISSN 1838-708X
Publication date 2010-12-03
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status
Volume 2009-2010
Total pages 5
Editor Peter Spearritt
Marion Stell
Place of publication Brisbane, Australia
Publisher The University of Queensland
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Subject Original Creative Work - Other
Abstract Queensland’s historical landscape encapsulates the tension between threat and survival. Climate and geography – humid jungles, desert plains, and a hazardous coastline; extreme weather – storms, cyclones, floods, and droughts; and conflicted politics – Aboriginal massacres, intolerance and insularity, have shaped the people of Queensland. The story of Queensland is filled with incidents of astonishing survival. We treasure these stories for what they tell us of human endurance and resilience. We wonder: how did they survive? how did they go on? We marvel at the resilience of human body, mind and spirit, and at the ferocious, unforgiving and indiscriminatory force of nature. Could we sustain the same ordeals or would we succumb? None of us knows until confronted by disaster, disease or accident.
Keyword Accidents
Climate
Cyclones
Disaster
Disease
Floods
Homeless
Storms
Unemployed
Weather
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Date created: 3 December 2010

 
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Created: Fri, 17 Dec 2010, 09:28:09 EST by Dr Celmara Pocock on behalf of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies Unit