Assessment of the consistency between different laboratory froth stability measurements

Tang, Dong, Wightman, Elaine M., Franzidis, J-P. and Gonzalo Montes-Atenas (2010). Assessment of the consistency between different laboratory froth stability measurements. In: , XXV International Mineral Processing Congress - IMPC 2010 'Smarter processing for the future. International Mineral Processing Congress 2010, Brisbane, Qld, Australia, (2425-2432). 6-10 September, 2010.

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Author Tang, Dong
Wightman, Elaine M.
Franzidis, J-P.
Gonzalo Montes-Atenas
Title of paper Assessment of the consistency between different laboratory froth stability measurements
Conference name International Mineral Processing Congress 2010
Conference location Brisbane, Qld, Australia
Conference dates 6-10 September, 2010
Convener Ralph, J. Holmes
Proceedings title XXV International Mineral Processing Congress - IMPC 2010 'Smarter processing for the future
Journal name XXV International Mineral Processing Congress 2010, IMPC 2010
Place of Publication Carlton, VIC, Australia
Publisher Australasian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy
Publication Year 2010
Year available 2010
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 9781921522284
Volume 3
Start page 2425
End page 2432
Total pages 8
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Froth stability is generally acknowledged as a key factor in achieving the required selectivity in froth flotation processes. Many techniques have been developed to assess froth stability, such as maximum froth height, the rate of froth decay (froth half-life time) and water recovery. The present work aims to assess the consistency between these different measurements. Experimental work was undertaken in both two-phase (liquid/gas) and three-phase (solids/liquid/ gas) systems. The two-phase systems were made up using two commercial frothers with different molecular structures (one a glycol and the other an alcohol type frother) at a range of concentrations. Fine hydrophilic solids and coarse hydrophobic solids, at different per cent solids, were added to make up the three-phase systems A foaming column was used to measure the maximum froth height and the rate of froth decay, while laboratory batch flotation tests were conducted to measure the water recovery. All three measures of froth stability suggested that froth stability increased with increasing frother concentration, but did not always provide a consistent interpretation on the effects of solid loading on froth stability. The results also indicated that the hydrophilic (non-floating or entrained) particles were the main component in the feed promoting stability in the froth phase, in these systems.
Keyword Flotation
Batch flotation
Foaming column
Frother
Froth stability
Water recovery
Froth half life time
Maximum froth height
Froth decay
Drainage
Hydrophobicity
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Thu, 16 Dec 2010, 15:47:19 EST by Karen Holtham on behalf of Julius Kruttschnitt Mineral Research Centre