The importance of the cloacal bursae as the primary site of aquatic respiration in the freshwater turtle, Elseya albagula

FitzGibbon, Sean I. and Franklin, Craig E. (2010) The importance of the cloacal bursae as the primary site of aquatic respiration in the freshwater turtle, Elseya albagula. Australian Zoologist, 35 2: 276-282.


Author FitzGibbon, Sean I.
Franklin, Craig E.
Title The importance of the cloacal bursae as the primary site of aquatic respiration in the freshwater turtle, Elseya albagula
Journal name Australian Zoologist   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0067-2238
Publication date 2010-04-01
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 35
Issue 2
Start page 276
End page 282
Total pages 7
Place of publication Sydney, NSW, Australia
Publisher Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Abstract The ability of freshwater turtles to exchange respiratory gases with their aquatic environment is well known and facilitates prolonged dive durations among several species. Three main sites have been implicated in aquatic respiration (skin, cloaca and buccopharynx) yet the relative contribution of each to total aquatic O2 uptake has been poorly examined among Australian chelids. In this study we investigated the diving physiology of Elseya albagula, a bimodally respiring turtle from Queensland, Australia. Through partitioning experiments we tested the hypothesis that the cloacal bursae are the main site of aquatic O2 uptake in this species. Aquatic oxygen uptake accounted for 70 ± 8% of total oxygen requirements demonstrating the impressive ability of the species to respire underwater, although this was negatively correlated with body mass. Further, the cloacal bursae were found to account for 48% of total aquatic oxygen uptake, providing strong evidence that they are the primary site of aquatic respiration in E albagula.
Keyword Bimodal breathing
Bimodal respiration
Diving
Mary River
Metabolic rate
Oxygen consumption
Physiology
Reptile
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 14 Dec 2010, 21:26:07 EST by Gail Walter on behalf of School of Biological Sciences