Inventing international society: A history of the English school

Dunne, Timothy Inventing international society: A history of the English school. New York, U.S.A.: St. Martin's Press, 1998.

Author Dunne, Timothy
Title Inventing international society: A history of the English school
Place of Publication New York, U.S.A.
Publisher St. Martin's Press
Publication year 1998
Sub-type Research book (original research)
Series St. Antony's series
ISBN 9780312215453
0312215452
Language eng
Start page 1
End page 207
Total number of pages 207
Abstract/Summary Inventing International Society is a narrative history of the English School of International Relations. After E.H. Carr departed from academic international relations in the late 1940s, Martin Wight became the most theoretically innovative scholar in the discipline. Wight found an institutional setting for his ideas in the British Committee, a group which Herbert Butterfield inaugurated in 1959. The book argues that this date should be regarded as the origin of a distinctive English School of International Relations. In addition to tracing the history of the school, the book argues that later English School scholars, such as Hedley Bull and R.J. Vincent, have made a significant contribution to the new normative thinking in international relations.
Q-Index Code A1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

 
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Created: Tue, 14 Dec 2010, 10:33:04 EST by Matthew Lamb on behalf of Dorothy Hill Physical Sciences & Engineer Library