Relationship between childhood short stature and academic achievement in adolescents and young adults - A longitudinal study

Tran, Uyen N., O'Callaghan, Michael J., Mamun, Abdullah A., Najman, Jake M., Williams, Gail M. and Bor, William (2010) Relationship between childhood short stature and academic achievement in adolescents and young adults - A longitudinal study. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 46 11: 660-667. doi:10.1111/j.1440-1754.2010.01816.x


Author Tran, Uyen N.
O'Callaghan, Michael J.
Mamun, Abdullah A.
Najman, Jake M.
Williams, Gail M.
Bor, William
Title Relationship between childhood short stature and academic achievement in adolescents and young adults - A longitudinal study
Journal name Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1034-4810
1440-1754
Publication date 2010-11
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1754.2010.01816.x
Volume 46
Issue 11
Start page 660
End page 667
Total pages 8
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Aim: To determine if short stature at 14 or 21years and patterns of 'catch-up' growth from 5 to 14 or 21years are related to academic achievement in adolescents.

Methods: The Mater University of Queensland Study of Pregnancy is a longitudinal study of 7223 singleton infants born between 1981 and 1984. Data were available for cross-sectional analyses of 3785 adolescents of whom 2149 were seen as young adults. Longitudinal patterns of growth were examined for 2936 subjects from 5 to 14years and 1753 subjects from 5 to 21years.

Results:
Adolescents or young adults with height <10th centile had a lower mean Wide Range Achievement Test (WRAT) score in adolescence and at 21years than those of normal height (2.7 and 3.0 points, respectively) and increased odds of a WRAT score <85 (1.57 and 1.87, respectively) and learning difficulties (1.61 and 1.78, respectively). For growth patterns from 5 to 14years, adolescents short at 5years, irrespective of height at 14years, had a lower mean WRAT score and increased odds of WRAT score <85 and learning difficulties. However, for growth patterns from 5 to 21 years, only the group short at both ages had increased learning difficulties.

Conclusions:
Youth short at 14years or at 21years and those persistently short have an increased prevalence of academic difficulties. Catch-up growth by 21, although not 14years, was associated with improved outcomes. © 2010 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).
Keyword Adolescent
Body height
Educational measurement
Learning disorder
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Mater Health Services Publications
Official 2011 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 12 Dec 2010, 00:05:09 EST