The nature and significance of the economics of information for economic science

Wilmer, G. W. (1987). The nature and significance of the economics of information for economic science Honours Thesis, School of Economics, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Wilmer, G. W.
Thesis Title The nature and significance of the economics of information for economic science
School, Centre or Institute School of Economics
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 1987
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Total pages 79
Language eng
Subjects 14 Economics
Formatted abstract The object of the inquiry is to identify the cause of the 'emergence of information economics, which seemingly resides in the recent spectacular advent of sophisticated computers and intelligent electronics. Superficially at least, it suggests that one of the suppositions of the classical and neo-classical model is either invalid or defective, because if the model presupposes perfect knowledge it would have no need for a branch of economic science devoted to perfecting the marketability of information on which knowledge depends. The economics of information could then only be designed with a view to perfecting knowledge, but doing so within the framework of the methodology of economic science. The thesis will therefore aim to discover the source of this paradox by tracing the emergence of modern science as the model for economic science in order to replace what was considered an unenlightened understanding of human things.

Document type: Thesis
Collection: UQ Theses (non-RHD) - UQ staff and students only
 
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