A development and revision of Ronald Heiner's thesis on the origin of predictable behaviour : the viability of an alternative to the rationality postulate

Thompson, Malcolm. (1986). A development and revision of Ronald Heiner's thesis on the origin of predictable behaviour : the viability of an alternative to the rationality postulate Honours Thesis, School of Economics, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Thompson, Malcolm.
Thesis Title A development and revision of Ronald Heiner's thesis on the origin of predictable behaviour : the viability of an alternative to the rationality postulate
School, Centre or Institute School of Economics
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 1986
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Total pages 74
Language eng
Subjects 14 Economics
Formatted abstract This thesis outlines a new approach to the prediction of human behaviour in economics. As an alternative to the conventional rationality postulate, the work the reliability analysis of Ronald A. Heiner - posits that uncertainty exists as the gap between an agent's competence and the difficulty of the decision problem faced, and that it is because of this that they will respond according to an inflexible set of "known” actions and are thus predictable. The proceeding work seeks to place the reliability approach in context of conventional theory and trace its position among less orthodox literature. The main aim however, is to further develop and revise aspects of the new framework as well as elucidate some fresh applications for it. In this way too the more implicit objective of the thesis - investigating the viability of Heiner's analysis as an alternative to the rational conception of behaviour in economics - is served.

 
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