Aging and its effects on inflammation in skeletal muscle at rest and following exercise-induced muscle injury

Peake, Jonathan, Della Gatta, Paul and Cameron-Smith, David (2010) Aging and its effects on inflammation in skeletal muscle at rest and following exercise-induced muscle injury. American Journal of Physiology: Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology, 298 6: R1485-R1495. doi:10.1152/ajpregu.00467.2009


Author Peake, Jonathan
Della Gatta, Paul
Cameron-Smith, David
Title Aging and its effects on inflammation in skeletal muscle at rest and following exercise-induced muscle injury
Journal name American Journal of Physiology: Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0363-6119
Publication date 2010-06
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1152/ajpregu.00467.2009
Volume 298
Issue 6
Start page R1485
End page R1495
Total pages 11
Place of publication Bethesda, MD, U.S.A.
Publisher American Physiological Society
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The world's elderly population is expanding rapidly, and we are now faced with the significant challenge of maintaining or improving physical activity, independence, and quality of life in the elderly. Counteracting the progressive loss of muscle mass that occurs in the elderly, known as sarcopenia, represents a major hurdle in achieving these goals. Indirect evidence for a role of inflammation in sarcopenia is that markers of systemic inflammation correlate with the loss of muscle mass and strength in the elderly. More direct evidence is that compared with skeletal muscle of young people, the number of macrophages is lower, the gene expression of several cytokines is higher, and stress signaling proteins are activated in skeletal muscle of elderly people at rest. Sarcopenia may also result from inadequate repair and chronic maladaptation following muscle injury in the elderly. Macrophage infiltration and the gene expression of certain cytokines are reduced in skeletal muscle of elderly people compared with young people following exercise-induced muscle injury. Further research is required to identify the cause(s) of inflammation in skeletal muscle of elderly people. Additional work is also needed to expand our understanding of the cells, proteins, and transcription factors that regulate inflammation in the skeletal muscle of elderly people at rest and after exercise. This knowledge is critical for devising strategies to restrict sarcopenia, and improve the health of today's elderly population.

Copyright © 2010 the American Physiological Society
Keyword Sarcopenia
Cytokines
Macrophages
Exercise
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Mon, 06 Dec 2010, 11:30:52 EST