Trading in terms: Linguistic affiliation in Arandic songs and alternate registers

Turpin, Myfany and Green, Jenny (2011). Trading in terms: Linguistic affiliation in Arandic songs and alternate registers. In Ilana Mushin, Brett Baker, Rod Gardner and Mark Harvey (Ed.), Indigenous language and social identity: Papers in honour of Michael Walsh (pp. 297-318) Canberra, ACT, Australia: Pacific Linguistics.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Turpin, Myfany
Green, Jenny
Title of chapter Trading in terms: Linguistic affiliation in Arandic songs and alternate registers
Title of book Indigenous language and social identity: Papers in honour of Michael Walsh
Place of Publication Canberra, ACT, Australia
Publisher Pacific Linguistics
Publication Year 2011
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
ISBN 9780858836181
0858836181
Editor Ilana Mushin
Brett Baker
Rod Gardner
Mark Harvey
Volume number 626
Chapter number 17
Start page 297
End page 318
Total pages 22
Total chapters 22
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Abstract/Summary It is usual for Aboriginal languages to be associated with both a linguistic variety and a tract of land (Sutton 2002:23, Peterson 1976, Henderson 2002:3).1 Aboriginal languages have an intrinsic relationship to place, and this contrasts with a language such as ' English', which refers primarily to a comrnunjcation variety rather than geographic area. In central Australia, language names are associated with a geographic region, and areas where they meet may be associated with both languages. Some Aboriginal languages, such as Kaytetye, have a very precise place of origin, recounted in the creation narratives of the land (Turpin 2003:2). A creation story for north-eastern Arnhem Land similarly unites place and language: 'I am putting you here, this is the language you should talk' says the ancestor (Evans 2010:5). Because Aboriginal language names refer to both a linguistic variety and geographic affiliation a person can identify as a 'language X' person even when they are unable to speak language X. Conversely, fluent speakers of a language to which they have no geographic affiliation might not identify with that language at all, a situation encountered in many parts of the Northern Territory (Wilkins 1989, Walsh 1997:6). This paper explores the relationship between language use and language identity in everyday speech and alternate registers in Arandic languages. In section 17.1 we provide background on the Arandic speech community, discussing the use and meaning of Arandic language names. In section 17.2 we discuss how everyday speech can be indicative of language identity. We then give examples of how words from neighbouring varieties arc used in song (section 17.3) and in the respect register (section 17.4) showing how the multilingualism of speakers in the region can be exploited in alternate speech registers. [Introduction Extract]
Q-Index Code B1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Description: xiv, 404 pages : maps, portrait ; 25 cm

 
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Created: Mon, 06 Dec 2010, 11:30:33 EST by Dr Myfany Turpin on behalf of School of Languages and Cultures